UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

Republican Leaders Oppose Repeal of Top Two

“As former Republican state legislative leaders, we’ve each been responsible for electing Republicans. We know what it takes to win, and what’s at stake.

We’re writing to strongly recommend that Republican delegates reject the current efforts to repeal Proposition 14. Repealing Proposition 14 right now would rescue California Democrats from their brutal and costly infighting, and would almost certainly unleash a potentially devastating tsunami of money against our Republican candidates, a tsunami that might put us in super minority status indefinitely.

Just look at the facts. As reported by Cal Watchdog, over the past three election cycles, Democrats have spent a staggering $197 million on intraparty battles under Proposition 14. The Democratic infighting under Proposition 14 has become so vicious that Politico recently wrote that California’s Democratic Party has plunged into “civil war,” and the Chair of the Democratic Party recently warned that Proposition 14 is the “gravest danger” facing the Democratic Party.

When your opponents are attacking each other, the best strategy is to get out of the way.

It’s difficult enough to win legislative seats when Democrats are currently outraising Republicans 3 to 1. You don’t have to fully support the top two primary to realize that now is no time to repeal Proposition 14 and give the Democrats a $197 million dollar gift – enough to spend $3 million targeting every single Republican legislator in the State Senate or State Assembly.

Our California Republican Party faces challenges, and the comeback won’t happen overnight. But needed reforms are taking hold and the party is headed in the right direction in the long term. Whether you support Proposition 14 or not, we should all agree that it’s a positive development that the Democrats are spending $197 million against their own candidates instead of against ours.

Let’s focus on rebuilding our party – not theirs. We urge you to join us in rejecting current efforts to repeal Proposition 14.”

Bob Huff
Senate Republican Leader
2012-2015

Martin Garrick
Assembly Republican Leader 2010

Sam Blakeslee
Assembly Republican Leader
2009-2010

George Plescia
Assembly Republican Leader
2006

Robert Naylor
Assembly Republican Leader 1982-1984
CRP Chairman 1987-1989

 


Ling Ling Chang: Former Assemblywoman Seeks Recall Seat

Former Assemblywoman Ling Ling Chang has announced that she is running for the seat of Josh Newman, the embattled state senator facing a recall challenge after voting to increase the gas tax.  Winning the seat would break the Democrats’ two-thirds supermajority in the state Senate.

Chang said, “During my two years in the legislature I helped stop $32 billion in tax hikes, improved the state’s jobs climate and fought hard to protect the middle class.”
 
“By contrast, Josh Newman voted to raise gas and car taxes by $52 billion and increased the cost of living for the average SD 29 family by $300 a year”.  Chang concluded, “I’m running for State Senate and support the recall because we can’t afford three more years of Josh Newman”.
 
Ling Ling Chang has an impressive background.  After working with technology and non-profits, being active in her community and serving in local government, she was elected to the state Assembly in 2014, representing district 55, which includes parts of Orange, Los Angeles, and San Bernardino Counties.  
 
In the Assembly Chang served as Vice Chair of the Rules Committee and as a member of the Appropriations Committee and the Business & Professions Committee.  She was recognized as one of two “Tech Champions” in the Legislature by the Computing Technology Industry Association.  Her top priorities were job creation, making California business-friendly, strengthening California’s education system, and keeping our communities safe.  Among other things, she worked to improve STEM education and voted against tax increases.

In 2016 her state Senate seat opened up, and she ran for it with encouragement from outgoing Senator Bob Huff and other Republican leaders.  The district, Senate District 29, runs from Anaheim to West Covina along Highway 57.  (See the map.) Democrat Josh Newman defeated Chang by a margin of less than one percent.

In a recall election, voters vote on whether to recall the senator.  Candidates to replace him run at the same time, but their votes are counted only if there is a majority vote to remove the incumbent senator.  If the senator is removed, the candidate with the highest number of votes wins, whether or not it’s a majority.  The date of the special recall election has not yet been set.

Ling Ling Chang emigrated from Taiwan with her family when she was three and grew up in Diamond Bar.  She worked as a project manager for a health information systems firm.  She also worked as Executive Director of United Family Services Center.  More recently she was President & CEO of the Youth Science Center, a non-profit education organization that focuses on strengthening Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) curriculum and education in local schools. 

During the same period, Ling Ling Chang was elected to public office: first the Walnut Valley Water District board, where she helped keep utility rates low, and then the Diamond Bar City Council, where she served two terms including a stint as mayor. An advocate for excellence in education, Ling Ling Chang served on the Board of Cal Poly Pomona’s Partners-in-Education. She was also a member of the US Army Los Angeles Advisory Board.

Ling Ling Chang and her husband Andrew make their home in Diamond Bar. 

On Sunday, September 17, Ling Ling Chang has Bay Area fundraising events in Menlo Park and Fremont.  See the full listings here. You can learn more about Ling Ling Chang’s campaign for State Senate on her website, www.lingforsenate.org.

GOP IN THE NEWS (cont.)


Ling-Ling Chang to run in SD 29 Recall Election

Ling-Ling Chang (R-Diamond Bar) today announced she would be a candidate in the 29th State Senate District election should the recall against Senator Josh Newman qualify for the ballot.

A former Assemblywoman, city councilwoman and water board member, Chang lost to Newman by less than 1% in 2016 and is best positioned to replace Newman should voters recall him.

Chang noted, “During my two years in the legislature I helped stop $32 billion in tax hikes, improved the state’s jobs climate and fought hard to protect the middle class.”

“By contrast, Josh Newman voted to raise gas and car taxes by $52 billion and increased the cost of living for the average SD 29 family by $300 a year, said Chang.

“Senator Newman also voted to increase the tax on diesel fuel, which will make our food more expensive and supported a government take over of health care that would cost at least $300 billion and give government control over how often we see our doctors.”

“I’m running for State Senate and support the recall because we can’t afford three more years of Josh Newman,” concluded Chang.

Chang also released a long list of endorsements highlighted by U.S. Representative, Ed Royce; Senate Republican Leader, Pat Bates, former state Senator Bob Huff and the bulk of the Republican legislators who represent the three counties in SD 29.

Recall proponents have submitted over 100,000 signatures of voters who support the recall of Josh Newman. They need 63,500 verified signatures to qualify the recall election for the ballot.

By Steven Greenhut
CalWatchdog.com
July 26, 2017

Before the recent legislative recess, California Democratic leaders and Gov. Jerry Brown announced their intention to tackle one of the state’s biggest crises: housing affordability. It’s the rare instance where virtually everyone in the Capitol at least is in agreement about the scope of the problem, even though there’s far less agreement on solutions.

Real-estate prices have gotten so high that they stretch family budgets and are a root cause of California’s highest-in-the-nation poverty rates, based on the Census Bureau’s new cost-of-living-adjusted poverty measure.

The situation is so acute it’s drawn the attention of the national media. “A full-fledged housing crisis has gripped California, marked by a severe lack of affordable homes and apartments for middle-class families,” according to a recent New York Times article. Median home prices have hit a “staggering $500,000, twice the national cost.”

Read More

Union bill will drive up counties’ costs of providing services

By Steven Greenhut
California Policy Center
July 25, 2017

Municipal governments exist to provide essential services, such as law enforcement, firefighting, parks and recreation, street repairs and programs for the poor and homeless. But as pension, health-care and other compensation costs soar for workers and retirees alike, local governments are struggling to fulfill these basic functions.

There’s even a term to describe that situation. “Service insolvency” is when localities have enough money to pay their bills, but not enough left over to provide adequate public service. These governments are not insolvent per se, but there’s little they can afford beyond paying the salaries and benefits of their workers.

As a city manager quoted in a newspaper article once quipped, California cities have become pension providers that offer a few public services on the side. It’s a sad state of affairs when local governments exist to do little more than pay the people who work for them.

Read More

Fake Achievement: The Rising High School Graduation Rate

Lance Izumi
Heritage.org
July 20, 2017

Over the past several years, the U.S. high school graduation rate has climbed significantly. That increase, however, is not necessarily due to better performance by our nation’s public schools or to higher achievement by our students. Rather, across America, states and local school districts are lowering the bar for earning a high school diploma, which—lo and behold—raises the graduation rate.

According to the latest data, an all-time high of more than eight out of 10 U.S. high school students graduated four years after starting the ninth grade. Yet that rate is deceiving. States have been lowering their bars for graduation for years.

Read More


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LIST OF UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

GOP IN THE NEWS


By Jon Coupal
The Orange County Registrar – Opinion
September 15, 2017

Does anyone honestly think that the California Legislature’s complete abandonment of the middle class is unrelated to the state’s highest-in-the-nation poverty rate?

This past week presented a stark contrast in the Golden State. First, the controller reported state tax proceeds from all categories are exceeding budget projections. Specifically, the state brought in almost $9 billion in August, exceeding projections in the state budget by over $340 million. All three of the major sources of state revenue — personal and corporate income tax plus sales tax — were up over last year. While a substantial portion of this uptick in economic activity can be attributed to the Trump recovery, there is no denying that California remains an economic powerhouse in its own right.

However, about the same time as we were getting cheery news about state revenue, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that over 20 percent of Californians live in poverty. The “Supplemental Poverty Measure,” which takes into account California’s absurdly high cost of living, gives us the highest poverty rate in the country while the rest of the nation has shown improvement.

Read More


2018 Governor’s Race Develops: Cox and Allen Are Running

Learn more about the two top Republicans who are running for Governor, and the candidate who dropped out to consolidate the field. Go To Article

RECALL UPDATE


Republican Leaders
Oppose Repeal of Top Two

“As former Republican state legislative leaders, we’ve each been responsible for electing Republicans. We know what it takes to win, and what’s at stake.

We’re writing to strongly recommend that Republican delegates reject the current efforts to repeal Proposition 14. Repealing Proposition 14 right now would rescue California Democrats from their brutal and costly infighting, and would almost certainly unleash a potentially devastating tsunami of money against our Republican candidates, a tsunami that might put us in super minority status indefinitely.

Just look at the facts. As reported by Cal Watchdog, over the past three election cycles, Democrats have spent a staggering $197 million on intraparty battles under Proposition 14. The Democratic infighting under Proposition 14 has become so vicious that Politico recently wrote that California’s Democratic Party has plunged into “civil war,” and the Chair of the Democratic Party recently warned that Proposition 14 is the “gravest danger” facing the Democratic Party.

When your opponents are attacking each other, the best strategy is to get out of the way.

It’s difficult enough to win legislative seats when Democrats are currently outraising Republicans 3 to 1. You don’t have to fully support the top two primary to realize that now is no time to repeal Proposition 14 and give the Democrats a $197 million dollar gift – enough to spend $3 million targeting every single Republican legislator in the State Senate or State Assembly.

Our California Republican Party faces challenges, and the comeback won’t happen overnight. But needed reforms are taking hold and the party is headed in the right direction in the long term. Whether you support Proposition 14 or not, we should all agree that it’s a positive development that the Democrats are spending $197 million against their own candidates instead of against ours.

Let’s focus on rebuilding our party – not theirs. We urge you to join us in rejecting current efforts to repeal Proposition 14.”

Bob Huff
Senate Republican Leader
2012-2015

Martin Garrick
Assembly Republican Leader 2010

Sam Blakeslee
Assembly Republican Leader
2009-2010

George Plescia
Assembly Republican Leader
2006

Robert Naylor
Assembly Republican Leader 1982-1984
CRP Chairman 1987-1989

 

 


Ling Ling Chang: Former Assemblywoman Seeks Recall Seat

Former Assemblywoman Ling Ling Chang has announced that she is running for the seat of Josh Newman, the embattled state senator facing a recall challenge after voting to increase the gas tax.  Winning the seat would break the Democrats’ two-thirds supermajority in the state Senate.

Chang said, “During my two years in the legislature I helped stop $32 billion in tax hikes, improved the state’s jobs climate and fought hard to protect the middle class.”
 
“By contrast, Josh Newman voted to raise gas and car taxes by $52 billion and increased the cost of living for the average SD 29 family by $300 a year”.  Chang concluded, “I’m running for State Senate and support the recall because we can’t afford three more years of Josh Newman”.
 
Ling Ling Chang has an impressive background.  After working with technology and non-profits, being active in her community and serving in local government, she was elected to the state Assembly in 2014, representing district 55, which includes parts of Orange, Los Angeles, and San Bernardino Counties.  
 
In the Assembly Chang served as Vice Chair of the Rules Committee and as a member of the Appropriations Committee and the Business & Professions Committee.  She was recognized as one of two “Tech Champions” in the Legislature by the Computing Technology Industry Association.  Her top priorities were job creation, making California business-friendly, strengthening California’s education system, and keeping our communities safe.  Among other things, she worked to improve STEM education and voted against tax increases.
 
In 2016 her state Senate seat opened up, and she ran for it with encouragement from outgoing Senator Bob Huff and other Republican leaders.  The district, Senate District 29, runs from Anaheim to West Covina along Highway 57.  (See the map.) Democrat Josh Newman defeated Chang by a margin of less than one percent.
 
In a recall election, voters vote on whether to recall the senator.  Candidates to replace him run at the same time, but their votes are counted only if there is a majority vote to remove the incumbent senator.  If the senator is removed, the candidate with the highest number of votes wins, whether or not it’s a majority.  The date of the special recall election has not yet been set.
 
Ling Ling Chang emigrated from Taiwan with her family when she was three and grew up in Diamond Bar.  She worked as a project manager for a health information systems firm.  She also worked as Executive Director of United Family Services Center.  More recently she was President & CEO of the Youth Science Center, a non-profit education organization that focuses on strengthening Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) curriculum and education in local schools. 
 
During the same period, Ling Ling Chang was elected to public office: first the Walnut Valley Water District board, where she helped keep utility rates low, and then the Diamond Bar City Council, where she served two terms including a stint as mayor. An advocate for excellence in education, Ling Ling Chang served on the Board of Cal Poly Pomona’s Partners-in-Education. She was also a member of the US Army Los Angeles Advisory Board.
 
Ling Ling Chang and her husband Andrew make their home in Diamond Bar.
 
On Sunday, September 17, Ling Ling Chang has Bay Area fundraising events in Menlo Park and Fremont.  See the full listings here. You can learn more about Ling Ling Chang’s campaign for State Senate on her website, www.lingforsenate.org.

GOP IN THE NEWS (cont.)


Democrats and Republicans see different solutions to California housing crisis

By Steven Greenhut
CalWatchdog.com
July 26, 2017

Before the recent legislative recess, California Democratic leaders and Gov. Jerry Brown announced their intention to tackle one of the state’s biggest crises: housing affordability. It’s the rare instance where virtually everyone in the Capitol at least is in agreement about the scope of the problem, even though there’s far less agreement on solutions.

Real-estate prices have gotten so high that they stretch family budgets and are a root cause of California’s highest-in-the-nation poverty rates, based on the Census Bureau’s new cost-of-living-adjusted poverty measure.

The situation is so acute it’s drawn the attention of the national media. “A full-fledged housing crisis has gripped California, marked by a severe lack of affordable homes and apartments for middle-class families,” according to a recent New York Times article. Median home prices have hit a “staggering $500,000, twice the national cost.”

Read More


Union bill will drive up counties’ costs of providing services

By Steven Greenhut
California Policy Center
July 25, 2017

Municipal governments exist to provide essential services, such as law enforcement, firefighting, parks and recreation, street repairs and programs for the poor and homeless. But as pension, health-care and other compensation costs soar for workers and retirees alike, local governments are struggling to fulfill these basic functions.

There’s even a term to describe that situation. “Service insolvency” is when localities have enough money to pay their bills, but not enough left over to provide adequate public service. These governments are not insolvent per se, but there’s little they can afford beyond paying the salaries and benefits of their workers.

As a city manager quoted in a newspaper article once quipped, California cities have become pension providers that offer a few public services on the side. It’s a sad state of affairs when local governments exist to do little more than pay the people who work for them.

Read More


Fake Achievement: The Rising High School Graduation Rate

Lance Izumi
Heritage.org
July 20, 2017

Over the past several years, the U.S. high school graduation rate has climbed significantly. That increase, however, is not necessarily due to better performance by our nation’s public schools or to higher achievement by our students. Rather, across America, states and local school districts are lowering the bar for earning a high school diploma, which—lo and behold—raises the graduation rate.

According to the latest data, an all-time high of more than eight out of 10 U.S. high school students graduated four years after starting the ninth grade. Yet that rate is deceiving. States have been lowering their bars for graduation for years.

Read More


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