UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

Bay Area Voter Guide

Voters throughout California are choosing their candidates to move on to the November election. This includes a few write-in candidates who deserve your consideration. Please be mindful of each county’s instructions for writing in a candidate to make sure your vote counts. Click here to view an example for Santa Clara County.

Write-in Candidates:

Joe Grcar, Ph.D. for Assembly District 20 – website

Burt Lancaster for Assembly District 27 – web page

Jeanne Solnordal for Congressional District 13 – flyer

Justin Aguilera for Congressional District 19 – website

Bay Area Nominees and Recommendations:

Matt Heath for Assembly District 2

Lisa Romero for Assembly District 11

Pranav Jandhyala for Assembly District 15

Catharine Baker for Assembly District 16

Steve Slauson for Assembly District 18

Keith Bogden for Assembly District 19

Christina Laskowski for Assembly District 22

Alex Glew for Assembly District 24

Bob Brunton for Assembly District 25

Michael Snyder for Assembly District 28

Vicki Nohrden for Assembly District 29

Neil Kitchens for Assembly District 30

Victor San Vicente for State Senate District 10

Rob Poythress for State Senate District 12

Dale Mensing for Congressional District 2

Charlie Schaupp for Congressional District 3

Marla Livengood for Congressional District 9

John Fitzgerald for Congressional District 11

Lisa Remmer for Congressional District 12

Cristina Osmena for Congressional District 14

Rudy Peters for Congressional District 15

Ron Cohen for Congressional District 17

Christine Russell for Congressional District 18

Not sure about your districts, or want to see endorsements published by the California Republican Party? Visit this webpage: cagop.yourvoter.guide.

Write In Justin Aguilera for the South Bay’s Congressional District 19

When he heard that his Representative in Congress, Democrat Zoe Lofgren, had no opponent, Justin Aguilera stepped up to take on the challenge himself.  However, he needs voters to write in his name so that he can become our Republican candidate in the fall election.
 
Justin has an entrepreneurial spirit.  He has been working in Silicon Valley as Director of Business Development and Marketing for a bail bonds company, as well as similar work for Global Supply Industries Inc.
 
Dedicated to community service, Justin has worked with various charities, including tutoring and passing out goods at Sacred Heart in San Jose, preparing food at Dorothy’s Kitchen, and volunteering at STAR Riders in Marina, where they provide horseback riding to disabled children.
 
Having spoken to many young people, Justin is aware of the many issues that affect the children of Santa Clara County.  They grow up in an age of ever advancing technology, with a staggering amount of student loans, and difficulties in finding affordable housing.
 
Congressional District 19 runs from central San Jose down Highway 101 to Gilroy.  (See the map.)  A voter from the district need only write the name “Justin Aguilera” on the appropriate place on the ballot, for either a mail-in ballot or at the polling place.
 
Justin Aguilera was born and raised in the Alum Rock distict of East San Jose.  He attended Valley Christian High School and received a scholarship to play baseball at California State University Monterey Bay where he majored in Kinesiology. 
 
His campaign says “As a lifelong athlete there is only one goal when he steps onto the field; that is to win.  As a candidate, that is exactly what Justin will accomplish, … the main goal of being a role model along with representing District 19 with everything that he is, to make sure our district is safer, our youth are protected and that they may have the best education possible.”
 
Justin says, “Accomplish anything with determination and perseverance.”
 
Justin Aguilera and his wife Candace reside in San Martin, south of San Jose.  You can learn more about Justin on his campaign website, www.JustinAguilera.com, or his Facebook page.

GOP IN THE NEWS (cont.)


California labor unions brace for a loss in landmark case

By Adam Ashton
Sacramento Bee
October 24, 2017

California labor leaders sound almost apocalyptic when they describe a looming Supreme Court case that many of them concede likely will cost them members and money.

“Everything is at stake,” says Yvonne Walker, president of Service Employees International Local 1000, state government’s largest union.

“It’s a blatant political attack,” says Eric Heins, the leader of the massive California Teachers Association.

“That’s a way that the corporations are trying to take our legs out from under us,” says Kim Cowart, a state registered nurse and SEIU union leader.

They’re alarmed by Janus v. AFSCME, the Illinois lawsuit that challenges the rights of unions in 22 states to collect so-called “fair-share” fees from employees who do not want to join bargaining groups but may benefit from representation. That practice has been legal and common since 1977, when the Supreme Court favored union arguments for fair-share fees in a lawsuit against the Detroit Board of Education.

Since then, business-backed groups and politicians have chipped away at fair-share fees across the country. They contend that the fees subsidize a union’s political activities, undermining the First Amendment rights of some workers.

Read More


A Tax By Any Other Name

By Joel Fox
Fox & Hounds
September 27, 2017

A Sacramento judge’s re-writing of the gas tax initiative title and summary will have implications on a title and summary for a second initiative on the same subject–and then the battle begins whether one or both measures make the ballot.

Sacramento Superior Court Judge Timothy Frawley is probably a fan of the writing style of Winston Churchill. The British Prime Minister, known for his adept use of the English language, said, “Broadly speaking, the short words are the best, and the old words best of all.”

The judge admonished the attorney general for trying to use the “amorphous and confusing term “revenues” to refer to “taxes” and “fees.””

The judge went on to say: “This is a remarkable argument since SB 1 raises new “revenues” solely by increasing taxes and fees.”

Read More


By Steven Greenhut
CalWatchdog.com
July 26, 2017

Before the recent legislative recess, California Democratic leaders and Gov. Jerry Brown announced their intention to tackle one of the state’s biggest crises: housing affordability. It’s the rare instance where virtually everyone in the Capitol at least is in agreement about the scope of the problem, even though there’s far less agreement on solutions.

Real-estate prices have gotten so high that they stretch family budgets and are a root cause of California’s highest-in-the-nation poverty rates, based on the Census Bureau’s new cost-of-living-adjusted poverty measure.

The situation is so acute it’s drawn the attention of the national media. “A full-fledged housing crisis has gripped California, marked by a severe lack of affordable homes and apartments for middle-class families,” according to a recent New York Times article. Median home prices have hit a “staggering $500,000, twice the national cost.”

Read More

Union bill will drive up counties’ costs of providing services

By Steven Greenhut
California Policy Center
July 25, 2017

Municipal governments exist to provide essential services, such as law enforcement, firefighting, parks and recreation, street repairs and programs for the poor and homeless. But as pension, health-care and other compensation costs soar for workers and retirees alike, local governments are struggling to fulfill these basic functions.

There’s even a term to describe that situation. “Service insolvency” is when localities have enough money to pay their bills, but not enough left over to provide adequate public service. These governments are not insolvent per se, but there’s little they can afford beyond paying the salaries and benefits of their workers.

As a city manager quoted in a newspaper article once quipped, California cities have become pension providers that offer a few public services on the side. It’s a sad state of affairs when local governments exist to do little more than pay the people who work for them.

Read More

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LIST OF UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

GOP IN THE NEWS


California labor unions brace for a loss in landmark case

By Adam Ashton
Sacramento Bee
October 24, 2017

California labor leaders sound almost apocalyptic when they describe a looming Supreme Court case that many of them concede likely will cost them members and money.

“Everything is at stake,” says Yvonne Walker, president of Service Employees International Local 1000, state government’s largest union.

“It’s a blatant political attack,” says Eric Heins, the leader of the massive California Teachers Association.

“That’s a way that the corporations are trying to take our legs out from under us,” says Kim Cowart, a state registered nurse and SEIU union leader.

They’re alarmed by Janus v. AFSCME, the Illinois lawsuit that challenges the rights of unions in 22 states to collect so-called “fair-share” fees from employees who do not want to join bargaining groups but may benefit from representation. That practice has been legal and common since 1977, when the Supreme Court favored union arguments for fair-share fees in a lawsuit against the Detroit Board of Education.

Since then, business-backed groups and politicians have chipped away at fair-share fees across the country. They contend that the fees subsidize a union’s political activities, undermining the First Amendment rights of some workers.

Read More


Meet write-in candidate Justin Aguilera, running in Santa Clara County’s 19th Congressional District

Go To Article

Bay Area Voter Guide

Voters throughout California are choosing their candidates to move on to the November election. This includes a few write-in candidates who deserve your consideration. Please be mindful of each county’s instructions for writing in a candidate to make sure your vote counts. Click here to view an example for Santa Clara County.

Write-in Candidates

Joe Grcar, Ph.D. for Assembly District 20 – website

Burt Lancaster for Assembly District 27 – web page

Jeanne Solnordal for Congressional District 13 – flyer

Justin Aguilera for Congressional District 19 – website

Bay Area Nominees and Recommendations

Matt Heath for Assembly District 2

Lisa Romero for Assembly District 11

Pranav Jandhyala for Assembly District 15

Catharine Baker for Assembly District 16

Steve Slauson for Assembly District 18

Keith Bogden for Assembly District 19

Christina Laskowski for Assembly District 22

Alex Glew for Assembly District 24

Bob Brunton for Assembly District 25

Michael Snyder for Assembly District 28

Vicki Nohrden for Assembly District 29

Neil Kitchens for Assembly District 30

Victor San Vicente for State Senate District 10

Rob Poythress for State Senate District 12

Dale Mensing for Congressional District 2

Charlie Schaupp for Congressional District 3

Marla Livengood for Congressional District 9

John Fitzgerald for Congressional District 11

Lisa Remmer for Congressional District 12

Cristina Osmena for Congressional District 14

Rudy Peters for Congressional District 15

Ron Cohen for Congressional District 17

Christine Russell for Congressional District 18

Not sure about your districts, or want to see endorsements published by the California Republican Party? Visit this webpage: cagop.yourvoter.guide.

Write In Justin Aguilera for the South Bay’s Congressional District 19

When he heard that his Representative in Congress, Democrat Zoe Lofgren, had no opponent, Justin Aguilera stepped up to take on the challenge himself.  However, he needs voters to write in his name so that he can become our Republican candidate in the fall election.
 
Justin has an entrepreneurial spirit.  He has been working in Silicon Valley as Director of Business Development and Marketing for a bail bonds company, as well as similar work for Global Supply Industries Inc.
 
Dedicated to community service, Justin has worked with various charities, including tutoring and passing out goods at Sacred Heart in San Jose, preparing food at Dorothy’s Kitchen, and volunteering at STAR Riders in Marina, where they provide horseback riding to disabled children.
 
Having spoken to many young people, Justin is aware of the many issues that affect the children of Santa Clara County.  They grow up in an age of ever advancing technology, with a staggering amount of student loans, and difficulties in finding affordable housing.
 
Congressional District 19 runs from central San Jose down Highway 101 to Gilroy.  (See the map.)  A voter from the district need only write the name “Justin Aguilera” on the appropriate place on the ballot, for either a mail-in ballot or at the polling place.
 
Justin Aguilera was born and raised in the Alum Rock distict of East San Jose.  He attended Valley Christian High School and received a scholarship to play baseball at California State University Monterey Bay where he majored in Kinesiology. 
 
His campaign says “As a lifelong athlete there is only one goal when he steps onto the field; that is to win.  As a candidate, that is exactly what Justin will accomplish, … the main goal of being a role model along with representing District 19 with everything that he is, to make sure our district is safer, our youth are protected and that they may have the best education possible.”
 
Justin says, “Accomplish anything with determination and perseverance.”
 
Justin Aguilera and his wife Candace reside in San Martin, south of San Jose.  You can learn more about Justin on his campaign website, www.JustinAguilera.com, or his Facebook page.

GOP IN THE NEWS (cont.)


A Tax By Any Other Name

By Joel Fox
Fox & Hounds
September 27, 2017

A Sacramento judge’s re-writing of the gas tax initiative title and summary will have implications on a title and summary for a second initiative on the same subject–and then the battle begins whether one or both measures make the ballot.

Sacramento Superior Court Judge Timothy Frawley is probably a fan of the writing style of Winston Churchill. The British Prime Minister, known for his adept use of the English language, said, “Broadly speaking, the short words are the best, and the old words best of all.”

The judge admonished the attorney general for trying to use the “amorphous and confusing term “revenues” to refer to “taxes” and “fees.””

The judge went on to say: “This is a remarkable argument since SB 1 raises new “revenues” solely by increasing taxes and fees.”

Read More


Democrats and Republicans see different solutions to California housing crisis

By Steven Greenhut
CalWatchdog.com
July 26, 2017

Before the recent legislative recess, California Democratic leaders and Gov. Jerry Brown announced their intention to tackle one of the state’s biggest crises: housing affordability. It’s the rare instance where virtually everyone in the Capitol at least is in agreement about the scope of the problem, even though there’s far less agreement on solutions.

Real-estate prices have gotten so high that they stretch family budgets and are a root cause of California’s highest-in-the-nation poverty rates, based on the Census Bureau’s new cost-of-living-adjusted poverty measure.

The situation is so acute it’s drawn the attention of the national media. “A full-fledged housing crisis has gripped California, marked by a severe lack of affordable homes and apartments for middle-class families,” according to a recent New York Times article. Median home prices have hit a “staggering $500,000, twice the national cost.”

Read More


Union bill will drive up counties’ costs of providing services

By Steven Greenhut
California Policy Center
July 25, 2017

Municipal governments exist to provide essential services, such as law enforcement, firefighting, parks and recreation, street repairs and programs for the poor and homeless. But as pension, health-care and other compensation costs soar for workers and retirees alike, local governments are struggling to fulfill these basic functions.

There’s even a term to describe that situation. “Service insolvency” is when localities have enough money to pay their bills, but not enough left over to provide adequate public service. These governments are not insolvent per se, but there’s little they can afford beyond paying the salaries and benefits of their workers.

As a city manager quoted in a newspaper article once quipped, California cities have become pension providers that offer a few public services on the side. It’s a sad state of affairs when local governments exist to do little more than pay the people who work for them.

Read More


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