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Citizens Commission Completes Redistricting

What the New Lines Mean for Bay Area Republicans

The California Citizens Redistricting Commission submitted new lines for Congressional, State Senate, Assembly and Board of Equalization districts by the Constitutionally mandated deadline of December 27.

New district lines bring both change and opportunity for Bay Area Republicans. Here are some of the more significant changes to district lines and representation in the greater Bay Area.

• The new Congressional District 18 now has a 50.5% Latino Citizen Voting Age Population (CVAP) and extends from San Jose to King City in Southern Monterey County. It includes all of San Benito County. This poses an interesting question for incumbent Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren: Will she run for re-election in a district designed to increase Latino representation in Congress? Accustomed to wielding the power of the majority, will she want to serve in Congress during the predicted Republican majority? At the age of 74 will she consider retirement?

• Republican Assemblyman Jordan Cunningham still has the heart of his old district – San Luis Obispo County. But he has gained area along the Monterey Coast and lost area in Northern Santa Barbara County. Republican registration has declined in the new district from what was already a competitive district under the old lines. But this could be a wave election for Republicans. Stay tuned.

• San Mateo County was split into Northern and Southern areas under the old Congressional and Assembly districts. The new districts divide San Mateo County into Pacific Coast and Bayside districts giving both a new look. Democrat Congresswoman Jackie Speier’s retirement provides an opportunity for change in the Congressional Delegation from San Mateo County.

• Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County’s second largest city, now has its own Assembly district. The district also includes Santa Clara, Cupertino and a portion of San Jose. While no incumbent currently lives in this district, Democrat Assemblyman Evan Low has announced that he will move into this district and run. Is there a home grown Republican who can challenge him?

• In the North Bay, Assemblyman Jim Frazier’s retirement provides an open seat in Solano and Contra Costa Counties. In the East Bay Assemblyman Bill Quirk has announced he will not run for re-election. Could these be opportunities for new Republican challengers?

You can check out the final district lines by clicking on the District Viewer in the blue box below. Please visit BayAreaGOP.com for more information on Bay Area politics and races. We look forward to highlighting some of the Republican candidates and campaigns in the coming months.

Citizens Commission Completes Redistricting

What the New Lines Mean for Bay Area Republicans

The California Citizens Redistricting Commission submitted new lines for Congressional, State Senate, Assembly and Board of Equalization districts by the Constitutionally mandated deadline of December 27.

New district lines bring both change and opportunity for Bay Area Republicans. Here are some of the more significant changes to district lines and representation in the greater Bay Area.

• The new Congressional District 18 now has a 50.5% Latino Citizen Voting Age Population (CVAP) and extends from San Jose to King City in Southern Monterey County. It includes all of San Benito County. This poses an interesting question for incumbent Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren: Will she run for re-election in a district designed to increase Latino representation in Congress? Accustomed to wielding the power of the majority, will she want to serve in Congress during the predicted Republican majority? At the age of 74 will she consider retirement?

• Republican Assemblyman Jordan Cunningham still has the heart of his old district – San Luis Obispo County. But he has gained area along the Monterey Coast and lost area in Northern Santa Barbara County. Republican registration has declined in the new district from what was already a competitive district under the old lines. But this could be a wave election for Republicans. Stay tuned.

• San Mateo County was split into Northern and Southern areas under the old Congressional and Assembly districts. The new districts divide San Mateo County into Pacific Coast and Bayside districts giving both a new look. Democrat Congresswoman Jackie Speier’s retirement provides an opportunity for change in the Congressional Delegation from San Mateo County.

• Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County’s second largest city, now has its own Assembly district. The district also includes Santa Clara, Cupertino and a portion of San Jose. While no incumbent currently lives in this district, Democrat Assemblyman Evan Low has announced that he will move into this district and run. Is there a home grown Republican who can challenge him?

• In the North Bay, Assemblyman Jim Frazier’s retirement provides an open seat in Solano and Contra Costa Counties. In the East Bay Assemblyman Bill Quirk has announced he will not run for re-election. Could these be opportunities for new Republican challengers?

You can check out the final district lines by clicking on the District Viewer in the blue box below. Please visit BayAreaGOP.com for more information on Bay Area politics and races. We look forward to highlighting some of the Republican candidates and campaigns in the coming months.

LIST OF UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

Ritesh Tandon Runs for Congress

By: Roger Riffenburgh

Ritesh Tandon, an engineer, entrepreneur, and nonprofit leader in Silicon Valley, is running for Congress in the South Bay. During his career he has worked to improve the lives of others both in the business he founded and in his nonprofit work.

Ritesh Tandon says he is running because he wants to take a stand against how far left government policies are going. He’s very concerned about companies leaving and mall shops being looted. He wants the government to deal with the misallocation of water resources, the homelessness issue, and the unprecedented gaps between the rich and poor.

Recently, Tandon has been doing research as a Garwood Innovation Fellow at the Garwood Center for Corporate Innovation at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. His research topic is “How to Revive California’s Economy Using Open Innovation.” He also continues as the CEO of Kricel Corporation, which he founded after working in engineering and marketing at Cisco and GN.

In 2021, Tandon won a U.S. Supreme Court case, Tandon v. Newsom, that defended the rights of religious groups during the pandemic.

As an executive committee member of a nonprofit, Ritesh helped build 11 super specialty eye care hospitals in India, where 150,000 free surgeries are performed every year for disadvantaged children. Ritesh served as president of another nonprofit, where he helped fund the education of over 1800 children and set up ten daycare centers. In addition, he worked to help needy families in the Bay Area.

Ritesh Tandon is running for the second time in Congressional District 17, which has not changed much as a result of redistricting. It includes part of Fremont, Milpitas, the Alviso and Berryessa areas of San Jose, Santa Clara, Sunnyvale, and Cupertino. The incumbent is Ro Khanna, who served in 2020 as a national co-chair for Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign. Tandon should benefit from the experience and exposure he gained during his 2020 campaign in the district.

The grandson of a freedom fighter for Indian independence, Ritesh Tandon grew up in northern India and earned a B.S. degree in engineering. After coming to the United States, he earned an M.S. in computer engineering and an MBA at Santa Clara University, he also met Zurica Dhar, a fellow computer engineer, whom he married. They have two children and live in San Jose.

You can find out more about Ritesh Tandon on his campaign website, tandonforcongress.com.

California Citizens Redistricting Commission – District Viewer

The Commission has developed a district viewer that allows you to more easily navigate visualizations and zoom in and out of geographic areas while layering congressional, State Senate and Assembly boundaries.

In the News


Rewarding failure in the K-12 system

By: Jon Coupal
dailybulletin.com
January 9, 2022

California spends a lot on education. Ever since the passage of Proposition 98 in 1988, which guarantees to education a minimum of 40% of the general fund, per-pupil spending on K-12 has risen faster than any other category of state appropriations. And yet, for all that new money, the state’s education monopoly continues its history of failure to deliver a quality product.

Just last month, this column cited the federal government’s National Center for Education Statistics, showing that in 2017-2018, the most recent year for which statistics are available, per-pupil spending for the state’s K-12 public schools was $13,129 in inflation-adjusted 2019-20 dollars, the highest ever. Measured in the same constant dollars, per-pupil spending was $9,594 in 1999-2000.

Read More


GOP ideas to solve California’s problems deserve consideration

By: George Skelton
mercurynews.com
January 7, 2022

Republicans have no power in the state Capitol. But they sometimes have good ideas. Democrats even steal them.

GOP legislators in the Senate and Assembly announced their spending priorities for 2022 this week and hardly anyone noticed.

Why would anyone? Republicans are considered practically irrelevant.

Democrats hold supermajorities in both houses. They’re able to pass any bill they want regardless of what Republicans think. And Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom is a good bet to sign it.

GOP lawmakers — an oxymoron in Sacramento — can’t pass anything without lots of Democratic help.

Read More


A Fi$Cal Crisis Faces California: CA Controller Candidate Lanhee Chen on the Continuing Missteps with the State’s Financial Accounting System

PRESS RELEASE
January 5, 2022

Mountain View, CA – A California State Auditor’s report published Tuesday revealed that Fi$Cal, California’s $1 billion project to implement a new financial reporting and accounting system, will miss another key deadline in 2022.

“Californians pay way too much in taxes and fees for this kind of incompetence in return. Fi$Cal is supposed to be finished already, but it’s way over-budget, late, and won’t even do what it’s supposed to. The same old politicians are giving the same old excuses about why they aren’t getting results. It’s time for change in Sacramento and common-sense leadership to bring true transparency and accountability to California’s finances,” said Lanhee Chen (@lanheechen), candidate for State Controller.

To learn more about Lanhee Chen and his campaign, visit his website: ChenForCalifornia.com


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