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Class in Session with Jeb Bush is a series of video conversations with the visionaries of today. Created specifically for secondary school students and relevant for the classroom, these 20-minute virtual conversations—hosted by former Florida Governor Jeb Bush—draw out personal and professional experiences and, especially important, elicit advice for America’s next generation from leaders across the nation. The first lesson features Secretary Condoleezza Rice.

 

 

Nisha Sharma Campaigns for Compassionate and Practical Solutions

Nisha Sharma, a realtor, a community leader, and a mother of three, is running for Congress in the East Bay’s District 11.  She says that if elected, she “will take her passion for helping others to Washington D.C. and fight for what is best for all of her constituents.”

Sharma’s priorities include dealing with the high cost of living, providing long-term solutions on infrastructure, and addressing homelessness.  With regard to homelessness she says, “It is neither humanitarian nor compassionate to let people live and die on our streets. We must help them get the mental health, drug addiction, housing, and employment help that they so desperately need.”

Nisha Sharma’s work in the community includes serving as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Fremont Dharma Samaj, one the largest socio-religious organizations in the Bay Area.  It brings 100,000 people a year together through different programs.  She also serves as the Women Empowerment Chairwoman for the Festival of the Globe.

Congressional District 11 has Highway 680 at its center and includes most of Contra Costa County, running from Pittsburg south to Danville and west to Richmond.  (See the map.)  The largest cities are Concord and Richmond.

Nisha Sharma was born in India.  She earned her bachelor’s degree in business at Punjab University of India in Chandigarh.

Nisha lives in Danville with her husband Vaneet. They have three kids.  You can find out more about Nisha on her campaign website, nishaforcongress.com.

Bay Area Republicans Phone-From-Home in COVID-19 Environment

How can you reach voters when people are afraid to open their doors during a pandemic?

Bay Area Republican volunteers used phone-from-home technology to turn out the GOP vote in the recent special elections won by State Senator Melissa Melendez and Congressman Mike Garcia.

The phone-from-home app Campaign Sidekick, used by the California Republican Party (CAGOP) in the May campaigns, is now available to county Republican parties to help register voters and elect Republican candidates.

The San Mateo GOP (SMGOP) has found a new use for Campaign Sidekick to register newly arrived Republican voters.  Working with the CAGOP and the Republican National Committee, the SMGOP was able to secure a list of Republicans from outside the area who had moved to San Mateo County.  The SMGOP is now using Campaign Sidekick to call those Republicans to ask them to register Republican at their new address.

The Santa Clara County Republican Party (SVGOP) partnered with the CAGOP and SPARC, a local Republican volunteer club, to sponsor a Campaign Sidekick training session for volunteers in the special election.  Those volunteers who made calls during the special election are now trained and ready to use the technology to support local Republican candidates this fall.  The SVGOP has already secured its own account and plans to incorporate Campaign Sidekick into its Neighborhood Leader Program.

In previous campaign cycles the SVGOP partnered with the CAGOP to install phone banks in its county headquarters.  However, phone-from-home technology has now surpassed the technology used in the old phone banks.  A significant advancement is a feature called “Power Dialer” which allows an individual to dial up to five people at once and then take the calls in order or leave messages as needed.  This technology allows an individual to make thousands of calls in the same time that a volunteer could make hundreds of calls using the old system.

Volunteers should go through training before making themselves available to county committees and candidates. Sign up for calling and other CAGOP trainings at this link.

With new technology, training, and motivated volunteers, the California GOP’s success in recent special elections can now be translated into success at the regional and county level.

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Bay Area CAGOP Vice Chair Jonathan Madison on Reforming Law Enforcement

GOP IN THE NEWS


California’s new budget unfairly hurts some of California’s best-performing schools, advocates say

By Mackenzie Hawkins
Sacramento Bee
July 3, 2020

School funding in California has long adhered to the guiding principle that the money follows the student.

But under this year’s education budget, lawmakers and education advocates warn, the state will abandon its traditional allocation formula in favor of a system that harms the very schools — disproportionately, charter schools and personalized education programs — that have performed best under pandemic pressures.

California’s public schools usually receive money based on a combination of the prior year’s funding and the current year’s average daily attendance — a metric that reflects not the number of students enrolled, but rather how many students show up each day.

Historically, this has meant that if a student switches schools from one year to the next, the money to fund their education moves with them. That will change under budget trailer bills AB 77 and SB 98, which allocate next year’s funding based on attendance through February 29 of this year.

Read More


Californians: What to know about your new state budget, in 2 minutes

By Jacob Ohara
CalMatters
July 1, 2020

In one fell swoop, the coronavirus pandemic took California’s state finances from “Celebrate Good Times” to no cause for much celebration at all. Here’s our two-minute recap of what you need to know:

So when Gov. Gavin Newsom signed the state’s $202.1 billion budget — putting a lid on weeks of negotiations with California legislators — it contained a bit of a wishful thinking. The prime wishful thought: that the Trump administration and Congress would see fit to send about $14 billion in federal aid by mid-October, avoiding some of the most painful cuts.

The biggest hitch: President Donald Trump has expressed aversion to a federal bailout.

California’s spending plan looks to balance an estimated $54-billion deficit that was spurred by the coronavirus pandemic. The budget takes into account the Newsom administration’s projections of an 18% unemployment rate and a nearly 9% decline in Californians’ personal income. 

Read More


Police unions’ power wanes, but how about teachers?

By Dan Walters
CalMatters
July 1, 2020

The fatal suffocation of George Floyd with a Minneapolis policeman’s knee pressing his neck into the pavement has ignited righteous outrage about police violence around the globe.

It also has focused much-needed attention on the cozy relationship between police unions and politicians and the laws and policies that protect violence-prone officers from consequences for their acts.

The unions get what they want from local and state officials, not only legal protections but generous salaries and pension benefits. The politicians also get what they want, campaign funds and union endorsements testifying to their crime-fighting credentials.

That mutual backscratching has been very evident in California in the 45 years since then-Gov. Jerry Brown signed collective bargaining legislation for public employees. Police unions have had virtual veto power over anything they considered to be adverse to their interests.

Read More


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Publisher’s Message: Bay Area Republicans Phone-From-Home in COVID-19 Environment

Feature Article: Nisha Sharma Campaigns for Compassionate and Practical Solutions

Sign Up for Newsletter

Trump Talk – Call Nationally to support the President
CAGOP Leadership Training – Campaign Sidekick & California Trump Victory


Click Here for information on COVID-19 testing locations in the Bay Area.

LIST OF UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.



Bay Area CAGOP Vice Chair Jonathan Madison on Reforming Law Enforcement

GOP In the News


California’s new budget unfairly hurts some of California’s best-performing schools, advocates say

By Mackenzie Hawkins
Sacramento Bee
July 3, 2020

School funding in California has long adhered to the guiding principle that the money follows the student.

But under this year’s education budget, lawmakers and education advocates warn, the state will abandon its traditional allocation formula in favor of a system that harms the very schools — disproportionately, charter schools and personalized education programs — that have performed best under pandemic pressures.

California’s public schools usually receive money based on a combination of the prior year’s funding and the current year’s average daily attendance — a metric that reflects not the number of students enrolled, but rather how many students show up each day.

Historically, this has meant that if a student switches schools from one year to the next, the money to fund their education moves with them. That will change under budget trailer bills AB 77 and SB 98, which allocate next year’s funding based on attendance through February 29 of this year.

Read More


Nisha Sharma Campaigns for Compassionate and Practical Solutions

Nisha Sharma, a realtor, a community leader, and a mother of three, is running for Congress in the East Bay’s District 11.  She says that if elected, she “will take her passion for helping others to Washington D.C. and fight for what is best for all of her constituents.”

Sharma’s priorities include dealing with the high cost of living, providing long-term solutions on infrastructure, and addressing homelessness.  With regard to homelessness she says, “It is neither humanitarian nor compassionate to let people live and die on our streets. We must help them get the mental health, drug addiction, housing, and employment help that they so desperately need.”

Nisha Sharma’s work in the community includes serving as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Fremont Dharma Samaj, one the largest socio-religious organizations in the Bay Area.  It brings 100,000 people a year together through different programs.  She also serves as the Women Empowerment Chairwoman for the Festival of the Globe.

Congressional District 11 has Highway 680 at its center and includes most of Contra Costa County, running from Pittsburg south to Danville and west to Richmond.  (See the map.)  The largest cities are Concord and Richmond.

Nisha Sharma was born in India.  She earned her bachelor’s degree in business at Punjab University of India in Chandigarh.

Nisha lives in Danville with her husband Vaneet. They have three kids. You can find out more about Nisha on her campaign website, nishaforcongress.com.

Bay Area Republicans Phone-From-Home in COVID-19 Environment

How can you reach voters when people are afraid to open their doors during a pandemic?

Bay Area Republican volunteers used phone-from-home technology to turn out the GOP vote in the recent special elections won by State Senator Melissa Melendez and Congressman Mike Garcia.

The phone-from-home app Campaign Sidekick, used by the California Republican Party (CAGOP) in the May campaigns, is now available to county Republican parties to help register voters and elect Republican candidates.

The San Mateo GOP (SMGOP) has found a new use for Campaign Sidekick to register newly arrived Republican voters.  Working with the CAGOP and the Republican National Committee, the SMGOP was able to secure a list of Republicans from outside the area who had moved to San Mateo County.  The SMGOP is now using Campaign Sidekick to call those Republicans to ask them to register Republican at their new address.

The Santa Clara County Republican Party (SVGOP) partnered with the CAGOP and SPARC, a local Republican volunteer club, to sponsor a Campaign Sidekick training session for volunteers in the special election.  Those volunteers who made calls during the special election are now trained and ready to use the technology to support local Republican candidates this fall.  The SVGOP has already secured its own account and plans to incorporate Campaign Sidekick into its Neighborhood Leader Program.

In previous campaign cycles the SVGOP partnered with the CAGOP to install phone banks in its county headquarters.  However, phone-from-home technology has now surpassed the technology used in the old phone banks.  A significant advancement is a feature called “Power Dialer” which allows an individual to dial up to five people at once and then take the calls in order or leave messages as needed.  This technology allows an individual to make thousands of calls in the same time that a volunteer could make hundreds of calls using the old system.

Volunteers should go through training before making themselves available to county committees and candidates. Sign up for calling and other CAGOP trainings at this link.

With new technology, training, and motivated volunteers, the California GOP’s success in recent special elections can now be translated into success at the regional and county level.

GOP IN THE NEWS (Cont)


 

Californians: What to know about your new state budget, in 2 minutes

By Jacob Ohara
CalMatters
July 1, 2020

In one fell swoop, the coronavirus pandemic took California’s state finances from “Celebrate Good Times” to no cause for much celebration at all. Here’s our two-minute recap of what you need to know:

So when Gov. Gavin Newsom signed the state’s $202.1 billion budget — putting a lid on weeks of negotiations with California legislators — it contained a bit of a wishful thinking. The prime wishful thought: that the Trump administration and Congress would see fit to send about $14 billion in federal aid by mid-October, avoiding some of the most painful cuts.

The biggest hitch: President Donald Trump has expressed aversion to a federal bailout.

California’s spending plan looks to balance an estimated $54-billion deficit that was spurred by the coronavirus pandemic. The budget takes into account the Newsom administration’s projections of an 18% unemployment rate and a nearly 9% decline in Californians’ personal income. 

Read More


Police unions’ power wanes, but how about teachers?

By Dan Walters
CalMatters
July 1, 2020

The fatal suffocation of George Floyd with a Minneapolis policeman’s knee pressing his neck into the pavement has ignited righteous outrage about police violence around the globe.

It also has focused much-needed attention on the cozy relationship between police unions and politicians and the laws and policies that protect violence-prone officers from consequences for their acts.

The unions get what they want from local and state officials, not only legal protections but generous salaries and pension benefits. The politicians also get what they want, campaign funds and union endorsements testifying to their crime-fighting credentials.

That mutual backscratching has been very evident in California in the 45 years since then-Gov. Jerry Brown signed collective bargaining legislation for public employees. Police unions have had virtual veto power over anything they considered to be adverse to their interests.

Read More


How Newsom could use his powers to revive California’s economy

By Daniel Kolkey
Orange County Register
June 29, 2020

With Californians facing double-digit unemployment in the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, California’s governor should be using his emergency powers to mitigate the pandemic’s effects on our economy.

Unfortunately, he has interpreted his emergency powers to authorize him to legislate additional costs on employing Californians.

Perhaps in good times, the state could add regulatory burdens on employment and small business without undermining the jobs market.  But these are not ordinary times.  The Wall Street Journal estimates that nearly 50 percent of leisure and hospitality jobs in California were lost between February and April.  The Southern California Association of Governments estimates that unemployment in Southern California will average 12.2 percent in 2021.

However, with the state facing a $54.3 billion budget deficit, it is hardly in a position to help.  The state will need to rely on the private sector, but the pandemic has reduced its revenues for hiring.  Thus, the governor must act to lighten the cost of hiring workers.

Read More


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