UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

CAGOP Convention Highlights #GasTaxtrophe!

Praises Republican Anti-Tax Legislators; Leaves Open Primary In Place

#GasTaxtrophe signs adorned convention walls highlighting the 12.5 cents per gallon gas and 20 cents per gallon diesel tax increases that kick in November 1st, courtesy of California Democrats in the legislature and governor’s office.  The California Republican Party has partnered with county parties around the state to highlight the Democrats’ insatiable appetite for tax increases with a series of events this Saturday, November 4.  Bay Area activities are included on the list of upcoming events on the Home page.

At the Chairman’s lunch in Anaheim, Jim Brulte presented polling data that showed Californians overwhelmingly oppose this new tax.  At the general session, CRP delegates passed a resolution praising Republican legislators who voted to oppose tax increases.

Delegates defeated by a 567-273 vote a resolution calling for repeal of California’s open primary. Debate on the floor highlighted the fact that the top two system is causing Democrats and public employee unions to waste millions of dollars fighting each other and that those same public employee unions would be the biggest beneficiary of top two repeal. 

To help our statewide candidates reach the general election, delegates approved an endorsement process for statewide offices.  Endorsements for statewide office will be considered at the next CRP convention May 4-6 in San Diego, so Chairman Brulte asked delegates to be prepared to stay late on Sunday May 6 to complete the voting.  Make your flight reservations now to get the best air fares.

The California Republican Veterans Association requalified as CRP chartered organization due to the hard work of CRVA Chairman Chuck McDougald and CRP Veterans Committee Chair Kevin Krick.  Thanks to both for creating a voice for veterans inside our party and a vehicle to bring more veterans into our ranks.

After many years of informal discussion among delegates, the party voted to continue steps to professionalize its operations by making the Chairman a paid position. The rule change also created a compensation committee to help determine the appropriate compensation level.

We are grateful to the many Bay Area delegates who traveled to Orange County to participate in this important gathering of party leadership.

Paul Graves for Contra Costa County District Attorney

Paul Graves is currently a Senior Deputy District Attorney in the office where he has worked for 22 years.  He says “I am running for Contra Costa District Attorney because I believe the people of Contra Costa deserve experienced, unifying, effective leadership which is beyond reproach.”

The DA office became vacant after previous District Attorney Mark Peterson was charged with misusing and misreporting campaign funds. At risk to his owner career, Paul Graves announced he would run for the position. Peterson eventually resigned and pleaded no contest as part of a plea deal.

Graves has supervised several prosecution units over the years, including general Felony, and currently Family Violence, which includes sexual assault and human trafficking.  Graves has prosecuted a broad range of offenses, everything from possession/sale of drugs and vehicle theft to gang-related crimes, sexual assaults, violent felonies, and homicides.  He has tried about 70 jury trials.

In his approach to the job, Paul Graves emphasizes victim-centered justice.  He stated that, “while all crimes, even misdemeanor crimes, can devastate lives, each presents an opportunity for a prosecutor to change and improve lives through victim advocacy.”  In addition to holding the defendant accountable, he works to obtain support services for the victim.

As district attorney, he would also focus on preventive approaches.  When he worked in the Juvenile unit, he tried to arrange sentences that would lead offenders to become productive members of society. The East Bay Times said that Paul Graves was the best pick to be interim DA.

Despite Graves’ wide support, the Board of Supervisors chose to appoint another candidate, Diana Becton, by a 3-2 vote, to be interim DA through 2018.  Becton is a judge whose progressive approach was heavily supported by liberal social justice groups.  Becton ran into her own integrity issues when it was revealed that she plagiarized parts of her application from Martin Luther King, Jr., and various other sources.

Paul Graves is running an agressive campaign in preparation for the June 2018 election. He has strong relationships with local law enforcement agencies and has endorsements from officers’ associations at over 20 agencies.

Born in South Bend, Indiana, Paul attended high school in Long Beach, California.  After receiving a baseball scholarship, he earned his bachelor’s degree at Loyola Marymount College.  Paul married his college sweetheart and went to law school at McGeorge School of Law at the University of the Pacific where he was elected to the Order of the Coif, the law school honor society.

Paul Graves lives in Contra Costa County with his wife and two children.  You can learn more about his campaign here. Supporters are invited to join Assemblywoman Catharine Baker and Supervisor Candace Andersen at his fundraiser on Nov. 3.

GOP IN THE NEWS


How did CalPERS dig a $153 billion pension hole?

By Dan Pellissier
The Mercury News
November 13, 2017

During the next five weeks, the CalPERS board, custodian of $326 billion in assets needed to fulfill retirement promises for 1.8 million California public employees and beneficiaries, will make decisions affecting government budgets for decades to come.

The problem is, despite their fiduciary duty under the state Constitution to “protect the competency of the assets” under their absolute control, CalPERS is roughly $153 billion short of fully funding the retirement promises earned to date.

How did CalPERS dig this huge hole?  During the last decade, they manipulated actuarial assumptions and methods to keep employer and employee contribution rates low in the short term.

Read More


California Dreamin’: Of Bolder Leaders Unafraid To Challenge The Vested Interests Running The Golden State—And Ruining Its Future

By Michael J. Boskin
Hoover Institution
November 7, 2017

Californians long led an idyllic version of the American Dream: lots of sunshine, jobs, upward mobility, home and automobile ownership, inviting ample space and tremendous mobility.  Long a harbinger of national trends and an incubator of innovation, the Golden State used to be home to steadily rising standards of living, outstanding public schools and universities, and enviable infrastructure.

But then something went radically wrong: California legislatures and governors built a welfare state of high tax rates, liberal entitlement benefits, and excessive regulation.  That backfired into results far worse than just a parody of a progressive utopia. Rather than the European-style green socio-economic equality fantasized by California’s coastal liberal elites, for most Californians it has Europe’s relative economic stagnation and is heading toward South America’s inequality.

Read More..


California labor unions brace for a loss in landmark case

By Adam Ashton
Sacramento Bee
October 24, 2017

California labor leaders sound almost apocalyptic when they describe a looming Supreme Court case that many of them concede likely will cost them members and money.

“Everything is at stake,” says Yvonne Walker, president of Service Employees International Local 1000, state government’s largest union.

“It’s a blatant political attack,” says Eric Heins, the leader of the massive California Teachers Association.

“That’s a way that the corporations are trying to take our legs out from under us,” says Kim Cowart, a state registered nurse and SEIU union leader.

They’re alarmed by Janus v. AFSCME, the Illinois lawsuit that challenges the rights of unions in 22 states to collect so-called “fair-share” fees from employees who do not want to join bargaining groups but may benefit from representation. That practice has been legal and common since 1977, when the Supreme Court favored union arguments for fair-share fees in a lawsuit against the Detroit Board of Education.

Since then, business-backed groups and politicians have chipped away at fair-share fees across the country. They contend that the fees subsidize a union’s political activities, undermining the First Amendment rights of some workers.

Read More


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LIST OF UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

GOP IN THE NEWS


How did CalPERS dig a $153 billion pension hole?

By Dan Pellissier
The Mercury News
November 13, 2017

During the next five weeks, the CalPERS board, custodian of $326 billion in assets needed to fulfill retirement promises for 1.8 million California public employees and beneficiaries, will make decisions affecting government budgets for decades to come.

The problem is, despite their fiduciary duty under the state Constitution to “protect the competency of the assets” under their absolute control, CalPERS is roughly $153 billion short of fully funding the retirement promises earned to date.

How did CalPERS dig this huge hole?  During the last decade, they manipulated actuarial assumptions and methods to keep employer and employee contribution rates low in the short term.

Read More


California Dreamin’: Of Bolder Leaders Unafraid To Challenge The Vested Interests Running The Golden State—And Ruining Its Future

By Michael J. Boskin
Hoover Institution
November 7, 2017

Californians long led an idyllic version of the American Dream: lots of sunshine, jobs, upward mobility, home and automobile ownership, inviting ample space and tremendous mobility.  Long a harbinger of national trends and an incubator of innovation, the Golden State used to be home to steadily rising standards of living, outstanding public schools and universities, and enviable infrastructure.

But then something went radically wrong: California legislatures and governors built a welfare state of high tax rates, liberal entitlement benefits, and excessive regulation.  That backfired into results far worse than just a parody of a progressive utopia. Rather than the European-style green socio-economic equality fantasized by California’s coastal liberal elites, for most Californians it has Europe’s relative economic stagnation and is heading toward South America’s inequality.

Read More..


Meet Contra Costa District Attorney Candidate Paul Graves

Go To Article

CAGOP Convention Highlights #GasTaxtrophe!

Praises Republican Anti-Tax Legislators 
Leaves Open Primary In Place

#GasTaxtrophe signs adorned convention walls highlighting the 12.5 cents per gallon gas and 20 cents per gallon diesel tax increases that kick in November 1st, courtesy of California Democrats in the legislature and governor’s office.  The California Republican Party has partnered with county parties around the state to highlight the Democrats’ insatiable appetite for tax increases with a series of events this Saturday, November 4.  Bay Area activities are included on the list of upcoming events on the Home page.

At the Chairman’s lunch in Anaheim, Jim Brulte presented polling data that showed Californians overwhelmingly oppose this new tax.  At the general session, CRP delegates passed a resolution praising Republican legislators who voted to oppose tax increases.

Delegates defeated by a 567-273 vote a resolution calling for repeal of California’s open primary. Debate on the floor highlighted the fact that the top two system is causing Democrats and public employee unions to waste millions of dollars fighting each other and that those same public employee unions would be the biggest beneficiary of top two repeal. 

To help our statewide candidates reach the general election, delegates approved an endorsement process for statewide offices.  Endorsements for statewide office will be considered at the next CRP convention May 4-6 in San Diego, so Chairman Brulte asked delegates to be prepared to stay late on Sunday May 6 to complete the voting.  Make your flight reservations now to get the best air fares.

The California Republican Veterans Association requalified as CRP chartered organization due to the hard work of CRVA Chairman Chuck McDougald and CRP Veterans Committee Chair Kevin Krick.  Thanks to both for creating a voice for veterans inside our party and a vehicle to bring more veterans into our ranks.

After many years of informal discussion among delegates, the party voted to continue steps to professionalize its operations by making the Chairman a paid position. The rule change also created a compensation committee to help determine the appropriate compensation level.

We are grateful to the many Bay Area delegates who traveled to Orange County to participate in this important gathering of party leadership.

 

 

Paul Graves for Contra Costa County District Attorney

Paul Graves is currently a Senior Deputy District Attorney in the office where he has worked for 22 years.  He says “I am running for Contra Costa District Attorney because I believe the people of Contra Costa deserve experienced, unifying, effective leadership which is beyond reproach.”

The DA office became vacant after previous District Attorney Mark Peterson was charged with misusing and misreporting campaign funds. At risk to his owner career, Paul Graves announced he would run for the position. Peterson eventually resigned and pleaded no contest as part of a plea deal.

Graves has supervised several prosecution units over the years, including general Felony, and currently Family Violence, which includes sexual assault and human trafficking.  Graves has prosecuted a broad range of offenses, everything from possession/sale of drugs and vehicle theft to gang-related crimes, sexual assaults, violent felonies, and homicides.  He has tried about 70 jury trials.

In his approach to the job, Paul Graves emphasizes victim-centered justice.  He stated that, “while all crimes, even misdemeanor crimes, can devastate lives, each presents an opportunity for a prosecutor to change and improve lives through victim advocacy.”  In addition to holding the defendant accountable, he works to obtain support services for the victim.

As district attorney, he would also focus on preventive approaches.  When he worked in the Juvenile unit, he tried to arrange sentences that would lead offenders to become productive members of society. The East Bay Times said that Paul Graves was the best pick to be interim DA.

Despite Graves’ wide support, the Board of Supervisors chose to appoint another candidate, Diana Becton, by a 3-2 vote, to be interim DA through 2018.  Becton is a judge whose progressive approach was heavily supported by liberal social justice groups.  Becton ran into her own integrity issues when it was revealed that she plagiarized parts of her application from Martin Luther King, Jr., and various other sources.

Paul Graves is running an agressive campaign in preparation for the June 2018 election. He has strong relationships with local law enforcement agencies and has endorsements from officers’ associations at over 20 agencies.

Born in South Bend, Indiana, Paul attended high school in Long Beach, California.  After receiving a baseball scholarship, he earned his bachelor’s degree at Loyola Marymount College.  Paul married his college sweetheart and went to law school at McGeorge School of Law at the University of the Pacific where he was elected to the Order of the Coif, the law school honor society.

Paul Graves lives in Contra Costa County with his wife and two children.  You can learn more about his campaign here. Supporters are invited to join Assemblywoman Catharine Baker and Supervisor Candace Andersen at his fundraiser on Nov. 3.

GOP IN THE NEWS


California labor unions brace for a loss in landmark case

By Adam Ashton
Sacramento Bee
October 24, 2017

California labor leaders sound almost apocalyptic when they describe a looming Supreme Court case that many of them concede likely will cost them members and money.

“Everything is at stake,” says Yvonne Walker, president of Service Employees International Local 1000, state government’s largest union.

“It’s a blatant political attack,” says Eric Heins, the leader of the massive California Teachers Association.

“That’s a way that the corporations are trying to take our legs out from under us,” says Kim Cowart, a state registered nurse and SEIU union leader.

They’re alarmed by Janus v. AFSCME, the Illinois lawsuit that challenges the rights of unions in 22 states to collect so-called “fair-share” fees from employees who do not want to join bargaining groups but may benefit from representation. That practice has been legal and common since 1977, when the Supreme Court favored union arguments for fair-share fees in a lawsuit against the Detroit Board of Education.

Since then, business-backed groups and politicians have chipped away at fair-share fees across the country. They contend that the fees subsidize a union’s political activities, undermining the First Amendment rights of some workers.

Read More


A Tax By Any Other Name

By Joel Fox
Fox & Hounds
September 27, 2017

A Sacramento judge’s re-writing of the gas tax initiative title and summary will have implications on a title and summary for a second initiative on the same subject–and then the battle begins whether one or both measures make the ballot.

Sacramento Superior Court Judge Timothy Frawley is probably a fan of the writing style of Winston Churchill. The British Prime Minister, known for his adept use of the English language, said, “Broadly speaking, the short words are the best, and the old words best of all.”

The judge admonished the attorney general for trying to use the “amorphous and confusing term “revenues” to refer to “taxes” and “fees.””

The judge went on to say: “This is a remarkable argument since SB 1 raises new “revenues” solely by increasing taxes and fees.”

Read More


Californians are mobilizing against new taxes

By Assemblyman Kevin Kiley
For Lincoln News Messenger
September 25, 2017

A few weeks ago, as the Legislature was wrapping up its final business of 2017, the Speaker of the Assembly hailed this year as the most “progressive” in California history. Now, I often do not agree with the Speaker. But in at least one sense, this superlative was accurate: the just-completed legislative session brought the tax burden of Californians to unprecedented heights.

New taxes and fees were slapped onto gasoline, vehicle registration, real estate transactions and even phone bills. While we were successful in defeating a dreadful water tax and yet another income tax hike, the overall growth in revenue – dollars transferred from citizens to government – is staggering, and I believe, exactly the wrong course for our state. And the people of California agree: Republicans, Democrats and Independents alike have registered broad opposition to these burdensome new taxes.

The good news is that citizen opposition is turning into grassroots action. The people of California are starting to fight back. When the Legislature imposed the largest gas tax increase in state history, $52 billion over 10 years, voters responded in two ways: by launching an initiative to repeal the gas tax and by initiating a recall against the Orange County senator who cast the deciding vote. Frustrated with politicians in Sacramento, citizens took matters into their own hands using the tools of direct democracy.

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