UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

Voters in Senate District 29 Persevere to Continue Recall of Senator Josh Newman

With passage of SB 117 in late August of 2017, Democrats added to a series of obstacles to a recall effort for Senator Josh Newman who cast a deciding vote on the gas tax increase. In an attempt to protect their colleague, and more importantly, their supermajority in the State Senate, this new law set up a daunting calendar of events that must transpire before a recall election can be called by the Governor.

Proponents of the recall effort could not be thwarted, and on October 25, 2017, voters in the 29th Senate District submitted a sufficient number of signatures to initiate a recall election.  This triggered a 30-day time period for a cost assessment to take place, with results announced by the State Department of Finance on December 11th.

Comparing the findings became the task of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee that was given yet another 30 days under SB 117 to review and comment. According to the report, a special election will cost $2,678,000 and a consolidated election will cost $931,000.

On or before January 11, when the 30 days have expired, the Secretary of State will certify the sufficiency of the signatures and the Governor will then set the date of the election. The California Constitution authorizes the Governor to call a recall election within 60 to 80 days or to consolidate it with a regularly scheduled election that is within 180 days of the certification of the signatures.

Whether he will use the higher cost of a special election to justify delaying the recall until June is not known, but is likely, since it would put the Senator at an advantage with a larger voter turnout.

In the meantime, the California Republican Party has a robust voter ID phone bank that has reached over 100,000 voters in the 29th Senate District. This operation will continue until the recall election.

For more information on the recall campaign, visit FireJoshNewman.com

Bay Area Businesswoman Cristina Osmeña to Run for Congressional District 14

Republican businesswoman Cristina Osmeña will run in the 14th Congressional District on a platform that focuses on fiscal responsibility, immigration reform, and combatting human trafficking.

The 14th Congressional district includes portions of San Francisco and San Mateo Counties.

Osmeña immigrated to the United States from the Philippines at the age of six when her family opposed, then fled, the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos. She grew up in California, exiled until the People Power revolution of 1986 brought President Corazon Aquino to power.

Cristina Osmeña built an independent life in the United States, put herself through UC Berkeley, and settled into a 20-year career in the financial industry. She was in New York, working as an equity analyst, when the World Trade Center was attacked.

Transitioning into the renewable energy industry, Osmeña worked with SunEdison and then took on an executive role at SunPreme, a solar module manufacturer based in Sunnyvale. She is currently on a leave of absence as the Vice President of Corporate Development.

Her platform of fiscal responsibility is based on her desire to take the next step toward fiscal reform. Having achieved tax reform that benefits all levels of income, and makes our businesses more competitive, she states we now need to reign in expenses to address the growing national debt, without sacrificing those in need of entitlements. She recently addressed the Americans for Tax Reform in Washington, D.C., and defends the tax bill in an article she wrote prior to passage. Read about her other priorities on her campaign website.

Osmeña is the great grand-daughter of Philippine President Sergio Osmeña (1944-46) who walked ashore with General McArthur after the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Cristina is married to Stephen O’Rourke, a developer of large scale renewable energy power plants. She currently writes a weekly column for the Philippine News.

 

GOP IN THE NEWS


Democrats Ring in the New Year with More Taxes and Regulations

By Jessica Patterson
Fox & Hounds
January 17, 2018

Elections have consequences, and millions of hardworking Californians felt those consequences when they started 2018 with higher taxes and more regulations.

As soon as the Democrats squeaked by with legislative supermajorities in 2016, they raced to enact countless laws and regulations. Here are a few ways the Democrat majority forced through legislation that harms California families and makes our state even less affordable.

The marquee example of one-party rule is the gas tax. Even the most liberal Democrats recognized that their gas tax was so toxic, they needed to fill the legislation with millions in taxpayer-funded pork barrel projects to garner the votes needed to pass it. Now fully in effect, not only does the gas tax hurt at the pump, vehicle license fees increased too.

Read More


Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America?

By Kerry Jackson
Opinion for LA Times
January 14, 2018

Guess which state has the highest poverty rate in the country? Not Mississippi, New Mexico, or West Virginia, but California, where nearly one out of five residents is poor. That’s according to the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which factors in the cost of housing, food, utilities and clothing, and which includes noncash government assistance as a form of income.

Given robust job growth and the prosperity generated by several industries, it’s worth asking why California has fallen behind, especially when the state’s per-capita GDP increased approximately twice as much as the U.S. average over the five years ending in 2016 (12.5%, compared with 6.27%).

It’s not as though California policymakers have neglected to wage war on poverty. Sacramento and local governments have spent massive amounts in the cause.

Read More

How to turn federal tax reform in California’s favor

By Assemblyman Kevin Kiley
Opinion for Sacramento Bee
January 11, 2018

With the reduction of the state and local tax deduction by Congress, many Californians are crying foul. Paying taxes on one’s full income first to Uncle Sam, and then again to Sacramento, has been called double taxation by Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León and other political leaders.

There is a simple solution to this problem. California should allow taxpayers to deduct their full federal tax liability on their state tax return – the state and local tax deduction (SALT) in reverse. I am introducing a bill – the Prosperous Economy and Payer Protection through Equitable Rates Act (or PEPPER) – to do just that.

Read More


 

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LIST OF UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

GOP In the News


Democrats Ring in the New Year with More Taxes and Regulations

By Jessica Patterson
Fox & Hounds
January 17, 2018

Elections have consequences, and millions of hardworking Californians felt those consequences when they started 2018 with higher taxes and more regulations.

As soon as the Democrats squeaked by with legislative supermajorities in 2016, they raced to enact countless laws and regulations. Here are a few ways the Democrat majority forced through legislation that harms California families and makes our state even less affordable.

The marquee example of one-party rule is the gas tax. Even the most liberal Democrats recognized that their gas tax was so toxic, they needed to fill the legislation with millions in taxpayer-funded pork barrel projects to garner the votes needed to pass it. Now fully in effect, not only does the gas tax hurt at the pump, vehicle license fees increased too.

Read More


Bay Area Businesswoman Cristina Osmeña to Run for CD 14

Learn about this accomplished businesswoman and her views on fiscal responsibility.

Go To Article

Voters in Senate District 29 Persevere to Continue Recall of Senator Josh Newman

With passage of SB 117 in late August of 2017, Democrats added to a series of obstacles to a recall effort for Senator Josh Newman who cast a deciding vote on the gas tax increase. In an attempt to protect their colleague, and more importantly, their supermajority in the State Senate, this new law set up a daunting calendar of events that must transpire before a recall election can be called by the Governor.

Proponents of the recall effort could not be thwarted, and on October 25, 2017, voters in the 29th Senate District submitted a sufficient number of signatures to initiate a recall election.  This triggered a 30-day time period for a cost assessment to take place, with results announced by the State Department of Finance on December 11th.

Comparing the findings became the task of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee that was given yet another 30 days under SB 117 to review and comment. According to the report, a special election will cost $2,678,000 and a consolidated election will cost $931,000.

On or before January 11, when the 30 days have expired, the Secretary of State will certify the sufficiency of the signatures and the Governor will then set the date of the election. The California Constitution authorizes the Governor to call a recall election within 60 to 80 days or to consolidate it with a regularly scheduled election that is within 180 days of the certification of the signatures.

Whether he will use the higher cost of a special election to justify delaying the recall until June is not known, but is likely, since it would put the Senator at an advantage with a larger voter turnout.

In the meantime, the California Republican Party has a robust voter ID phone bank that has reached over 100,000 voters in the 29th Senate District. This operation will continue until the recall election.

For more information on the recall campaign, visit FireJoshNewman.com

Bay Area Businesswoman Cristina Osmeña to Run for Congressional District 14

Republican businesswoman Cristina Osmeña will run in the 14th Congressional District on a platform that focuses on fiscal responsibility, immigration reform, and combatting human trafficking.

The 14th Congressional district includes portions of San Francisco and San Mateo Counties.

Osmeña immigrated to the United States from the Philippines at the age of six when her family opposed, then fled, the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos. She grew up in California, exiled until the People Power revolution of 1986 brought President Corazon Aquino to power.

Cristina Osmeña built an independent life in the United States, put herself through UC Berkeley, and settled into a 20-year career in the financial industry. She was in New York, working as an equity analyst, when the World Trade Center was attacked.

Transitioning into the renewable energy industry, Osmeña worked with SunEdison and then took on an executive role at SunPreme, a solar module manufacturer based in Sunnyvale. She is currently on a leave of absence as the Vice President of Corporate Development.

Her platform of fiscal responsibility is based on her desire to take the next step toward fiscal reform. Having achieved tax reform that benefits all levels of income, and makes our businesses more competitive, she states we now need to reign in expenses to address the growing national debt, without sacrificing those in need of entitlements. She recently addressed the Americans for Tax Reform in Washington, D.C., and defends the tax bill in an article she wrote prior to passage. Read about her other priorities on her campaign website.

Osmeña is the great grand-daughter of Philippine President Sergio Osmeña (1944-46) who walked ashore with General McArthur after the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Cristina is married to Stephen O’Rourke, a developer of large scale renewable energy power plants. She currently writes a weekly column for the Philippine News.

GOP IN THE NEWS (cont.)


Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America?

By Kerry Jackson
Opinion for LA Times
January 14, 2018

Guess which state has the highest poverty rate in the country? Not Mississippi, New Mexico, or West Virginia, but California, where nearly one out of five residents is poor. That’s according to the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which factors in the cost of housing, food, utilities and clothing, and which includes noncash government assistance as a form of income.

Given robust job growth and the prosperity generated by several industries, it’s worth asking why California has fallen behind, especially when the state’s per-capita GDP increased approximately twice as much as the U.S. average over the five years ending in 2016 (12.5%, compared with 6.27%).

It’s not as though California policymakers have neglected to wage war on poverty. Sacramento and local governments have spent massive amounts in the cause.

Read More

How to turn federal tax reform in California’s favor

By Assemblyman Kevin Kiley
Opinion for Sacramento Bee
January 11, 2018

With the reduction of the state and local tax deduction by Congress, many Californians are crying foul. Paying taxes on one’s full income first to Uncle Sam, and then again to Sacramento, has been called double taxation by Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León and other political leaders.

There is a simple solution to this problem. California should allow taxpayers to deduct their full federal tax liability on their state tax return – the state and local tax deduction (SALT) in reverse. I am introducing a bill – the Prosperous Economy and Payer Protection through Equitable Rates Act (or PEPPER) – to do just that.

Read More

 


High spending locks in need for future California tax increases

By Robert C. Lapsley
Opinion for Orange County Register
January 11, 2018

Thanks to Silicon Valley and the stock market, California’s budget is on a record recovery. Last year, we passed the largest budget in our state’s history at $291 billion; a record destined to be broken next year. Since Fiscal Year 2009, state taxes, fees and other charges have increased by $10 billion a year, now totaling $72 billion more in all.

Of that increase, $26 billion is due to higher fees, special taxes and other charges shifted to special funds. This increased revenue, the Legislature argued, was to stave off severe cuts during the recession. Clearly, the recession is over — and not a single fee, special tax or other revenue increase has been cut.

Californians now pay the highest income and state sales tax rates in the nation. In fact, with only 12 percent of the population, Californians pay 23 percent of all income tax collected by state and local governments in the U.S. But that’s not all. Thanks to a cumulative body of state and local regulations and fees, those who can afford to buy a new home in this state pay as much as $100,000 or more per home because of those regulations and fees. New regulations on the horizon will add even more cost to a new home, denying even more Californians the financial security of homeownership.

Read More

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