Jessica Patterson

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UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

Featured Event:

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

 

 

Bridget Mahoney Runs for Assembly

Bridget Mahoney, a public affairs consultant, is running for state assembly in District 22 in San Mateo County.

Asked why she’s running, Mahoney says “I am a proud lifelong resident of San Mateo County and I am running to represent my home, family, and your families in Sacramento. I want to represent a new generation of Republicans in California and protect the conservative values that our party upholds and represents.”

On her website she adds “Conservatives deserve a voice in San Mateo County and Bridget Mahoney is that choice. Issues in the district important to Bridget include lowering taxes on business and enhancing Prop. 13 tax benefits. Bridget will support Law Enforcement and work to keep our public education among the best in the country. Bridget intends to focus on the housing shortage as well as the addiction and mental health issues that have left so many homeless.”

Mahoney has also been a strong advocate of repealing AB5, the new California law that forces many independent contractors to become employees or perhaps lose their jobs.  She attended the Repeal AB5 rally last Tuesday, Jan. 28, at the state capitol.  She says “AB5 is a textbook example of a law backed by liberal special interests that is disrupting and devastating Californians from all walks of life. We need more common sense lawmakers who have lived in the real world and understand the consequences of their meddling.”

Assembly District 22 runs from South San Francisco down the Peninsula to Redwood City and also includes Pacifica on the coast.  (See the map.)

Bridget Mahoney was born and raised in San Mateo County.  She grew up in a large Irish-Italian family, the oldest of four sisters.  She attended Notre Dame Belmont High School and  went on to Sonoma State University, majoring in History with a minor in Political Science.  She earned a Master’s Degree in Public Affairs from the University of San Francisco and wrote her graduate capstone project on how ballot measures are an ineffective solution to San Francisco’s homeless crisis.  At USF she also served as a graduate student senator for the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bridget has always had a passion for public service.  She serves as Vice President of the Western Association Auxiliary of the Order of Malta, advancing their mission of serving the sick and the poor locally.  She volunteers on a young professionals board to raise money for ICA Cristo Rey, a girl’s high school located in San Francisco’s Mission District.  She appreciates her Catholic education and wishes to help underserved young women to receive the same.

In politics, Bridget has helped to reinstate the charter for the San Mateo County Young Republicans and is currently serving as Vice Chair for the group.  Professionally, she has worked in public affairs firms dealing with communications strategies.

To attend Bridget’s campaign kickoff February 11 in San Mateo, see the event listings.  You can learn more about Bridget Mahoney at her campaign website, mahoneyforassembly.com, or on her Facebook page.

Republicans Will Vote for President & County Central Committee in March 3 Election

The March 3 California Primary will include a once-every-four-years election for President and for members of Republican County Central Committees, in addition to the normal array of partisan and non-partisan offices.

According to the rules adopted by the California Republican Party, voters in these two elections must be registered Republicans.  While No Party Preference (NPP) voters may request a Democrat ballot, they must reregister Republican in order to vote for Donald Trump or members of Republican County Central Committees.

If you have received a letter asking if you would like to vote in the Democrat or other party primary, it means you are registered NPP and must reregister Republican if you want to vote in the Republican Primary.  Under California’s new same-day-registration rules, you can reregister at any time up until election day, however late registrants will need to cast a conditional ballot.

There have been numerous anecdotal reports that some Republicans have been mistakenly re-registered as NPP’s.  There is some evidence to suggest that the interactions with the Department of Motor Vehicles may be the source of these changes.  News reports suggest that the prompts in the on-line DMV system are confusing at best and misleading at worst.  If you are unsure about how you are registered you should check with your local Registrar of Voters. Many counties have an on-line system to verify your voter registration. View the list of County Elections Offices.

BayAreaGOP.com recommendations for Republican county central committees are listed in the BayAreaGOP Voter Guide along with our featured candidates.  In many cases, the number of candidates who file for central committee is less than or equal to the number of positions available.  In those cases, no recommendations are listed and generally those races to do not appear on the ballot.

BayAreaGOP on Twitter

Follow Our Tweets @BayAreaGOP

GOP IN THE NEWS


How California’s environmental rules deprive minorities of housing opportunities

By Matt Fleming
Orange County Registrar
February 8, 2020

California’s landmark environmental law is being used to promote racist redlining housing policies, according to a lawsuit filed by a group of liberal activists.

As readers of these editorial pages know, the California Environmental Quality Act has been abused in ways beyond anything having to do with the environment by NIMBYs to block development and by unions to extort preferential treatment.

But a relatively new state regulation added to the CEQA process has had disastrous effects on low-income minority communities, trapping them in a cycle of poverty and forcing them further from job centers or out of the state entirely.

The state needs to reform CEQA to allow more housing to be built. It’s that simple.

Read More


Democrats Pushing to Raise the Adult Prosecution Age while Lowering the Voting Age

San Diego News Desk
February 7, 2020

In a ridiculous move by California State Senator Nancy Skinner (D-Berkley), aims to increase the age for automatically facing criminal charges to the age of 20, under a newly proposed bill. Skinner argues that teenagers ages 18-19 are not mature enough to be treated and prosecuted as adults. Skinner’s office points out data linked to a study aimed at stating the obvious: 18 or 19-year-old brains have not fully developed and will not fully develop until several years later.

Skinner’s idea would place an unnecessary burden on the Juvenile Justice System that has seen a steady population decrease since 2006 due to more money being funneled into crime prevention. In a press release from Skinner’s office, they quoted statements from Alameda County public defender Brendon Woods, saying that “under California law, teenagers can’t buy cigarettes, beer, or even rent a car, yet they can be sent to prison for the rest of their lives. Kids should be treated like kids.”

Read More


Beware of indoctrination in the split roll fight

By Jon Coupal
Opinion for The Press-Enterprise
February 2, 2020

It’s no secret that public sector labor organizations hate Proposition 13 because it remains one of the few barriers to their unfettered access to our wallets and pocketbooks.

Whether in the courts, legislature, initiative measures or “public education” campaigns, their relentless resistance to that landmark initiative has continued unabated for over forty years.

Much to their frustration, however, Prop. 13’s popularity has remained consistent during that same period of time.

Today, the most significant threat to Proposition 13 is the proposed “split roll” initiative which is currently in the signature gathering phase. This proposal, labeled as The California Schools and Local Communities Funding Act of 2020, is a $12 billion property tax increase. It dismantles one of Prop. 13’s most important protections, the limitation on annual increases in taxable value.

Read More


Jessica Patterson

Chariot Ad

MTA Ad

Panavia Ad

Newsletter Ad

Publisher’s Message: Republicans Will Vote for President & County Central Committee in March 3 Election

Feature Article: Bridget Mahoney Runs for Assembly

Sign Up for Newsletter

LIST OF UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

 

Bridget Mahoney Runs for Assembly

Bridget Mahoney, a public affairs consultant, is running for state assembly in District 22 in San Mateo County.

Asked why she’s running, Mahoney says “I am a proud lifelong resident of San Mateo County and I am running to represent my home, family, and your families in Sacramento. I want to represent a new generation of Republicans in California and protect the conservative values that our party upholds and represents.”

On her website she adds “Conservatives deserve a voice in San Mateo County and Bridget Mahoney is that choice. Issues in the district important to Bridget include lowering taxes on business and enhancing Prop. 13 tax benefits. Bridget will support Law Enforcement and work to keep our public education among the best in the country. Bridget intends to focus on the housing shortage as well as the addiction and mental health issues that have left so many homeless.”

Mahoney has also been a strong advocate of repealing AB5, the new California law that forces many independent contractors to become employees or perhaps lose their jobs.  She attended the Repeal AB5 rally last Tuesday, Jan. 28, at the state capitol.  She says “AB5 is a textbook example of a law backed by liberal special interests that is disrupting and devastating Californians from all walks of life. We need more common sense lawmakers who have lived in the real world and understand the consequences of their meddling.”

Assembly District 22 runs from South San Francisco down the Peninsula to Redwood City and also includes Pacifica on the coast.  (See the map.)

Bridget Mahoney was born and raised in San Mateo County.  She grew up in a large Irish-Italian family, the oldest of four sisters.  She attended Notre Dame Belmont High School and  went on to Sonoma State University, majoring in History with a minor in Political Science.  She earned a Master’s Degree in Public Affairs from the University of San Francisco and wrote her graduate capstone project on how ballot measures are an ineffective solution to San Francisco’s homeless crisis.  At USF she also served as a graduate student senator for the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bridget has always had a passion for public service.  She serves as Vice President of the Western Association Auxiliary of the Order of Malta, advancing their mission of serving the sick and the poor locally.  She volunteers on a young professionals board to raise money for ICA Cristo Rey, a girl’s high school located in San Francisco’s Mission District.  She appreciates her Catholic education and wishes to help underserved young women to receive the same.

In politics, Bridget has helped to reinstate the charter for the San Mateo County Young Republicans and is currently serving as Vice Chair for the group.  Professionally, she has worked in public affairs firms dealing with communications strategies.

To attend Bridget’s campaign kickoff February 11 in San Mateo, see the event listings.  You can learn more about Bridget Mahoney at her campaign website, mahoneyforassembly.com, or on her Facebook page.

Republicans Will Vote for President & County Central Committee in March 3 Election

The March 3 California Primary will include a once-every-four-years election for President and for members of Republican County Central Committees, in addition to the normal array of partisan and non-partisan offices.

According to the rules adopted by the California Republican Party, voters in these two elections must be registered Republicans.  While No Party Preference (NPP) voters may request a Democrat ballot, they must reregister Republican in order to vote for Donald Trump or members of Republican County Central Committees.

If you have received a letter asking if you would like to vote in the Democrat or other party primary, it means you are registered NPP and must reregister Republican if you want to vote in the Republican Primary.  Under California’s new same-day-registration rules, you can reregister at any time up until election day, however late registrants will need to cast a conditional ballot.

There have been numerous anecdotal reports that some Republicans have been mistakenly re-registered as NPP’s.  There is some evidence to suggest that the interactions with the Department of Motor Vehicles may be the source of these changes.  News reports suggest that the prompts in the on-line DMV system are confusing at best and misleading at worst.  If you are unsure about how you are registered you should check with your local Registrar of Voters. Many counties have an on-line system to verify your voter registration. View the list of County Elections Offices.

BayAreaGOP.com recommendations for Republican county central committees are listed in the BayAreaGOP Voter Guide along with our featured candidates.  In many cases, the number of candidates who file for central committee is less than or equal to the number of positions available.  In those cases, no recommendations are listed and generally those races to do not appear on the ballot.

GOP IN THE NEWS


 

How California’s environmental rules deprive minorities of housing opportunities

By Matt Fleming
Orange County Registrar
February 8, 2020

California’s landmark environmental law is being used to promote racist redlining housing policies, according to a lawsuit filed by a group of liberal activists.

As readers of these editorial pages know, the California Environmental Quality Act has been abused in ways beyond anything having to do with the environment by NIMBYs to block development and by unions to extort preferential treatment.

But a relatively new state regulation added to the CEQA process has had disastrous effects on low-income minority communities, trapping them in a cycle of poverty and forcing them further from job centers or out of the state entirely.

The state needs to reform CEQA to allow more housing to be built. It’s that simple.

Read More


Democrats Pushing to Raise the Adult Prosecution Age while Lowering the Voting Age

San Diego News Desk
February 7, 2020

In a ridiculous move by California State Senator Nancy Skinner (D-Berkley), aims to increase the age for automatically facing criminal charges to the age of 20, under a newly proposed bill. Skinner argues that teenagers ages 18-19 are not mature enough to be treated and prosecuted as adults. Skinner’s office points out data linked to a study aimed at stating the obvious: 18 or 19-year-old brains have not fully developed and will not fully develop until several years later.

Skinner’s idea would place an unnecessary burden on the Juvenile Justice System that has seen a steady population decrease since 2006 due to more money being funneled into crime prevention. In a press release from Skinner’s office, they quoted statements from Alameda County public defender Brendon Woods, saying that “under California law, teenagers can’t buy cigarettes, beer, or even rent a car, yet they can be sent to prison for the rest of their lives. Kids should be treated like kids.”

Read More


Beware of indoctrination in the split roll fight

By Jon Coupal
Opinion for The Press-Enterprise
February 2, 2020

It’s no secret that public sector labor organizations hate Proposition 13 because it remains one of the few barriers to their unfettered access to our wallets and pocketbooks.

Whether in the courts, legislature, initiative measures or “public education” campaigns, their relentless resistance to that landmark initiative has continued unabated for over forty years.

Much to their frustration, however, Prop. 13’s popularity has remained consistent during that same period of time.

Today, the most significant threat to Proposition 13 is the proposed “split roll” initiative which is currently in the signature gathering phase. This proposal, labeled as The California Schools and Local Communities Funding Act of 2020, is a $12 billion property tax increase. It dismantles one of Prop. 13’s most important protections, the limitation on annual increases in taxable value.

Read More


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