Jessica Patterson

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UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

Featured Event:

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

 

Mike LeBarre: A Record of Service

Ten years ago Mike LeBarre was yelling at the TV about how messed up the government was.  Today he serves as the mayor of his city, teaming up with city staff, council colleagues, community organizations, active citizens, and many others to improve his city.

He also chairs the Monterey-Salinas Transit Board, sits on the Monterey County Water Resource Agency Board, and serves on numerous local and regional boards and committees advocating for resources to benefit the city and region.

How did LeBarre’s transformation happen?

Mike LeBarre grew up in Woodland, a town in an agricultural area in the Central Valley northwest of Sacramento.  He studied at Sacramento City College, worked in construction, and played in a rock and roll band.

After a few chapters of life, he was looking for a new start and found King City, a small town where he could afford a house and that reminded him of his agricultural roots.  King City is located on the Salinas River and Highway 101 in southern Monterey County.

About ten years ago Mike would see news about what was going on with the federal government, get upset, and complain loudly.  Eventually a family member told him to do something about it or be quiet.  A political career was born.

In 2010 LeBarre ran for Congress as a write-in candidate and got 12 votes.  In 2012 he ran again and got over 5000 votes, but didn’t make it past the primary.  Some people would have stopped there.  But Mike learned and met people along the way.  One of these suggested that LeBarre should be on the city’s Parks and Recreation Commission, to which he was appointed.

In 2013 Mike LeBarre was elected to the local high school board.  The district was under state control due to past problems.  Mike and his board colleagues put in place a 17% budget reserve, increased graduation rates, lowered dropout rates, and earned back their local control.  In addition, LeBarre completed the Masters in Governance training program for board members offered by the California School Boards Association.  The district now requires the program as a best practice for all board members.

In 2014 LeBarre was elected to the city council.  It was a challenging time, as one-third of the police department had been arrested in a car towing scandal earlier that year. In 2016 the council elected him mayor, and they reelected him two years later.  During this time the city rebuilt the police force, balanced the budget and put in a long-range budgeting tool to keep it balanced, developed a cannabis policy, brought an after school program to all the elementary schools and reduced shootings and homicides from a high of 32 shootings and three homicides in 2017, to zero since February 2018.  LeBarre credits the teamwork within the government and the community for being able to accomplish these projects.

Mike LeBarre says, “I believe everyone deserves a safe community where all are valued and respected. It is my goal to be an effective representative that solves problems and improves our quality of life.”

He also says, “I’m an individual, a father, and an American, and I’m a Republican because I care about all of those things.”

Mike LaBarre earns his living working in the fields for an agricultural lab, partnering with local farmers, ranchers, and vineyards to effectively manage their resources.

LeBarre has volunteered with several youth programs, including reading to elementary students, supporting the annual Farm Day for 3rd graders, mentoring Hartnell College students, and advocating for local youth soccer. He is a member of the Elks and the Chamber of Commerce and is a tribal member of the Comanche Indians. He says that his greatest joy is being a father.

Mike LeBarre may be contacted at mike.lebarre@att.net.

 

Bay Area Campaign Season Begins Early

California Judge Puts Trump Back on the Primary Ballot

California’s early primary, now set for March 3, 2020, has moved up the start of the Bay Area’s campaign season.  The opportunity to gather “in lieu signatures” for partisan races began on September 12, only a few days following the completion of the California Republican Party’s successful convention.  The filing process will continue through December 6 unless extended when an incumbent does not file.

Bay Area Republicans received good news when a U.S. District Court Judge suspended the legislature’s effort to deny President Trump a spot on the primary ballot, saying it would result in “irreparable harm without temporary relief” for Trump and other candidates.  Party leaders had publicly stated that failure to include Trump on the ballot could depress Republican turnout in the primary election.  The legal process will continue, but Republicans are optimistic that their efforts will prevail and Trump will be on the primary ballot.

San Francisco will hold its local election November 5, 2019 where Republican Ellen Zhou is running for Mayor along with five other candidates.  The highest profile issue on the ballot is Proposition C which would regulate the sale of e-cigarettes rather than ban them outright.  Bay Area residents will have the opportunity to see advertising both for and against this measure as both proponents and opponents appear to have purchased air-time on broadcast TV.

At its recent convention, The California Republican Party provided extensive training to help volunteers and candidates prepare for the 2020 elections.  Those opportunities will continue with training events throughout the state.  Please check our event listings on the BayAreaGOP.com home page for the upcoming training events in your region.

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GOP IN THE NEWS


Mass California blackout recalls shades of Gray Davis. Should Gavin Newsom be worried?

By Andrew Sheeler
Sacramento Bee
October 10, 2019

As more than a million Californians endure daily life in the shadows of a deliberate blackout by PG&E, there is one name many people on social media would like the state’s current governor, Gavin Newsom, to keep in mind: Gray Davis.

California’s 37th governor, like Newsom, presided over unpopular engineered outages. Those power outages proved to be Davis’ undoing, as some pointed out Thursday on Twitter.

“Power cuts in California. The cuts in 2000-01 weren’t fun. I wonder if Newsom will be the next Gray Davis,” wrote Twitter user Tony Nash.

Read More


Opinion: California pension debt climbs despite strong economy

By Joe Nation
The Mercury News
October 6, 2019

With nation overdue for next recession, aggressive and comprehensive reforms are needed.

A decade ago, at Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s request, I supervised a graduate student team that performed a comprehensive analysis of public pensions in California.

The goal was to calculate California’s state and local government pension debt, the difference between assets and liabilities.

The team’s conclusions: The unfunded liability was over $500 billion — seven times the number officially reported. That was in 2008.

The student team recommended several actions to lawmakers and pension managers. Almost all were ignored.

Read More


High housing prices + high gas prices + high utility prices=worst poverty rate in nation

Opportunity Now
September 20, 2019

Voices out of Sacramento may crow about about the booming California economy and how it supports a flurry of new taxes, entitlements, and regulations. But the Census Bureau presents a more sobering and saddening picture: California has the worst poverty rate in the country. By a lot.

The “functional” poverty rate, according to the Census Bureau, in the state is 18.2%. That rate is 300% higher than Iowa’s (at 6.8%).

It gets worse: when you calculate in what The Public Policy Institute calls “near poverty,” you can add in another 18%.

Which means that, as Dan Walters of Cal Matters notes, “more than 35% of Californians, perhaps 15 million human beings, are living in severe economic distress.”

Read More


Jessica Patterson

Chariot Ad

MTA Ad

Panavia Ad

Newsletter Ad

LIST OF UPCOMING GOP EVENTS

View more details for events on the Calendar of Upcoming Events or view the Monthly Calendar of Events.

 

GOP In the News


Mass California blackout recalls shades of Gray Davis. Should Gavin Newsom be worried?

By Andrew Sheeler
Sacramento Bee
October 10, 2019

As more than a million Californians endure daily life in the shadows of a deliberate blackout by PG&E, there is one name many people on social media would like the state’s current governor, Gavin Newsom, to keep in mind: Gray Davis.

California’s 37th governor, like Newsom, presided over unpopular engineered outages. Those power outages proved to be Davis’ undoing, as some pointed out Thursday on Twitter.

“Power cuts in California. The cuts in 2000-01 weren’t fun. I wonder if Newsom will be the next Gray Davis,” wrote Twitter user Tony Nash.

Read More


Mike LeBarre: A Record of Service

Ten years ago Mike LeBarre was yelling at the TV about how messed up the government was.  Today he serves as the mayor of his city, teaming up with city staff, council colleagues, community organizations, active citizens, and many others to improve his city.

He also chairs the Monterey-Salinas Transit Board, sits on the Monterey County Water Resource Agency Board, and serves on numerous local and regional boards and committees advocating for resources to benefit the city and region.

How did LeBarre’s transformation happen?

Mike LeBarre grew up in Woodland, a town in an agricultural area in the Central Valley northwest of Sacramento.  He studied at Sacramento City College, worked in construction, and played in a rock and roll band. 

After a few chapters of life, he was looking for a new start and found King City, a small town where he could afford a house and that reminded him of his agricultural roots.  King City is located on the Salinas River and Highway 101 in southern Monterey County.

About ten years ago Mike would see news about what was going on with the federal government, get upset, and complain loudly.  Eventually a family member told him to do something about it or be quiet.  A political career was born.

In 2010 LeBarre ran for Congress as a write-in candidate and got 12 votes.  In 2012 he ran again and got over 5000 votes, but didn’t make it past the primary.  Some people would have stopped there.  But Mike learned and met people along the way.  One of these suggested that LeBarre should be on the city’s Parks and Recreation Commission, to which he was appointed.

In 2013 Mike LeBarre was elected to the local high school board.  The district was under state control due to past problems.  Mike and his board colleagues put in place a 17% budget reserve, increased graduation rates, lowered dropout rates, and earned back their local control.  In addition, LeBarre completed the Masters in Governance training program for board members offered by the California School Boards Association. The district now requires the program as a best practice for all board members.

In 2014 LeBarre was elected to the city council.  It was a challenging time, as one-third of the police department had been arrested in a car towing scandal earlier that year. In 2016 the council elected him mayor, and they reelected him two years later.  During this time the city rebuilt the police force, balanced the budget and put in a long-range budgeting tool to keep it balanced, developed a cannabis policy, brought an after school program to all the elementary schools and reduced shootings and homicides from a high of 32 shootings and three homicides in 2017, to zero since February 2018.  LeBarre credits the teamwork within the government and the community for being able to accomplish these projects. 

Mike LeBarre says, “I believe everyone deserves a safe community where all are valued and respected. It is my goal to be an effective representative that solves problems and improves our quality of life.”

He also says, “I’m an individual, a father, and an American, and I’m a Republican because I care about all of those things.”

Mike LaBarre earns his living working in the fields for an agricultural lab, partnering with local farmers, ranchers, and vineyards to effectively manage their resources.

LeBarre has volunteered with several youth programs, including reading to elementary students, supporting the annual Farm Day for 3rd graders, mentoring Hartnell College students, and advocating for local youth soccer. He is a member of the Elks and the Chamber of Commerce and is a tribal member of the Comanche Indians. He says that his greatest joy is being a father.

Mike LeBarre may be contacted at mike.lebarre@att.net

Bay Area Campaign Season Begins Early

CA Judge Puts Trump Back on the Primary Ballot

California’s early primary, now set for March 3, 2020, has moved up the start of the Bay Area’s campaign season.  The opportunity to gather “in lieu signatures” for partisan races began on September 12, only a few days following the completion of the California Republican Party’s successful convention.  The filing process will continue through December 6 unless extended when an incumbent does not file.

Bay Area Republicans received good news when a U.S. District Court Judge suspended the legislature’s effort to deny President Trump a spot on the primary ballot, saying it would result in “irreparable harm without temporary relief” for Trump and other candidates.  Party leaders had publicly stated that failure to include Trump on the ballot could depress Republican turnout in the primary election.  The legal process will continue, but Republicans are optimistic that their efforts will prevail and Trump will be on the primary ballot.

San Francisco will hold its local election November 5, 2019 where Republican Ellen Zhou is running for Mayor along with five other candidates.  The highest profile issue on the ballot is Proposition C which would regulate the sale of e-cigarettes rather than ban them outright.  Bay Area residents will have the opportunity to see advertising both for and against this measure as both proponents and opponents appear to have purchased air-time on broadcast TV.

At its recent convention, The California Republican Party provided extensive training to help volunteers and candidates prepare for the 2020 elections.  Those opportunities will continue with training events throughout the state.  Please check our event listings on the BayAreaGOP.com home page for the upcoming training events in your region.

GOP IN THE NEWS (cont.)


 

Opinion: California pension debt climbs despite strong economy

By Joe Nation
The Mercury News
October 6, 2019

With nation overdue for next recession, aggressive and comprehensive reforms are needed.

A decade ago, at Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s request, I supervised a graduate student team that performed a comprehensive analysis of public pensions in California.

The goal was to calculate California’s state and local government pension debt, the difference between assets and liabilities.

The team’s conclusions: The unfunded liability was over $500 billion — seven times the number officially reported. That was in 2008.

The student team recommended several actions to lawmakers and pension managers. Almost all were ignored.

Read More


High housing prices + high gas prices + high utility prices=worst poverty rate in nation

Opportunity Now
September 20, 2019

Voices out of Sacramento may crow about about the booming California economy and how it supports a flurry of new taxes, entitlements, and regulations. But the Census Bureau presents a more sobering and saddening picture: California has the worst poverty rate in the country. By a lot.

The “functional” poverty rate, according to the Census Bureau, in the state is 18.2%. That rate is 300% higher than Iowa’s (at 6.8%).

It gets worse: when you calculate in what The Public Policy Institute calls “near poverty,” you can add in another 18%.

Which means that, as Dan Walters of Cal Matters notes, “more than 35% of Californians, perhaps 15 million human beings, are living in severe economic distress.”

Read More


One More to Veto

By Senator John Moorlach
Fox & Hounds
September 26, 2019

As Governor Newsom considers signing or vetoing hundreds of pieces of legislation before the Oct. 13 deadline, allow me to suggest another veto-worthy bill.  As it relates to adding debt, SB 268 (Wiener) will once again limit government transparency and prevent the public from knowing the true costs of bond measures when they appear on ballots.

It appears that Wiener’s bill comes as a reaction to a good government and open transparency bill, Assembly Bill 195, by Assemblyman Jay Obernolte (R – Big Bear), that required local officials to give more information on the cost of bond measures in the ballot summary.

Because local governments hated the idea of giving voters the true costs of the measures, Senator Wiener introduced SB 268. Read More


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